From D.C. to Baltimore!

Table Talk Cafe Alexandria D.C. Virginia

Hello from Baltimore!

I will be heading home from my trip tomorrow, but decided to spend the last day in Baltimore with his cousin Dylan. I’ve never been to Baltimore, but it’ll be a trip I never forget (more about that later). This was my friend’s first time truly visiting Washington D.C. and I’ve been wanting him to explore this place for so long. We stopped in Alexandria on our way back from Maine last summer, but it was so short and we didn’t have time to do anything other than grab a bite to eat. It’s been a blast and we still have so much more to explore the next time we are here. I have a couple more hours to finish this blog before the new season of the Bachelor comes on! Who else is excited that Ben is our Bachelor? I love reading all the live tweeting during the show!

Table Talk Cafe Alexandria D.C. Virginia

We grabbed breakfast at one of our favorite little spots in Alexandra, The Table Talk. I’ve been there about five times now and it never gets old. The service is quick, the food is delicious, and it’s very cheap. Plus, they have good coffee.

Table Talk Cafe Alexandria D.C. Virginia

I always order their fresh melons.

Table Talk Cafe Alexandria D.C. Virginia

I had two eggs over medium and an english muffin.

Touring Pentagon Touring Pentagon

T.C. took us over to tour the Pentagon.  The security guard kept giving me a hard time (jokingly) and telling them to keep a close eye on me.

Touring Pentagon

We were the only ones in there! It was pretty neat.

Touring Pentagon

The Pentagon is full of art and memorials.

Touring Pentagon

Our tour went on for miles.

Courtyard Pentagon

The courtyard was beautiful. It makes it so you can get from anywhere in the pentagon within fifteen minutes.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C.

After we visited the pentagon, we headed to the apartment to put on some comfortable clothes before heading to the monuments.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C.

First stop: The Arlington Cemetery.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C.

Each grave had a wreath and ribbon on it for the holidays.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C. Changing of the Guards

Memorial Amphitheater.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C. Changing of the Guards Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C. Changing of the Guards

We sat on the steps for about an hour so we could watch the changing of the guards. You can read all about this ceremony here.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C. Changing of the Guards

While we sat there waiting, we read all about the history of the guards.

Arlington Cemetary Washington D.C. Changing of the Guards

After the ceremony, we walked a couple miles to the Lincoln memorial.

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C. Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

We were freezing, so we stopped and grabbed coffee at the little cafe.

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

The monuments are gorgeous during the early morning sunrise and the evening sunset.

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

I thought this was the cutest moment ever!

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

The monuments were so crowded on Saturday!

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

We stood on the steps for a bit and enjoyed the moment.

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

Lincoln is GIANT! He looks so much smaller in photos and in movies… Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

Time to walk to the white house!

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

This is my favorite little path in D.C. and it’s probably one of the most famous spots. It takes you to the Washington Monument from the Lincoln Memorial. I love to ride bikes down here.

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

We didn’t walk up to it, but I’ll take him in the summer!

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C. Eisenhower Executive Office Building

This is also one of my favorite buildings in D.C. It’s the Eisenhower Executive Office Building. It is absolutely gorgeous and  enormous.

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

The detail on this building is breathtaking.

Exploring Monuments Washington D.C.

We were exhausted after a day of walking around, but that is what D.C. does to you! I love going in the summer becuase it’s more comfortable to walk around in shorts and a tank top. I LOVE the heat.

Founding Farmers Washington D.C.

Everyone has been telling me to try out Found Farmers in D.C. and I haven’t had the chance to. It was so close to the white house, so I finally got the chance to try it. We were freezing and super duper hungry!

We started out with some fried green tomatoes. They melted in your mouth and the dipping sauce was so good!

Founding Farmers Washington D.C.

I decided to go with their Farmer’s Salad. It had avocado, dates, tomatoes, grapes, almonds, romano, and a homemade vinaigrette. I could have eaten five more of these salads. It was freaking awesome!

Founding Farmers Washington D.C.

Chocolate mousse for two with hazelnut crunch, whipped cream, and a caramel sauce.

…it was really good.

Founding Farmers Washington D.C.

I did get to order a delicious capuchin with skim milk. It warmed me right up!

After dinner we caught a cab. We didn’t feel like freezing our butts off and walking to the metro.  I must have bad luck with cabs becuase this was a terrifying ride. Our cab driver was probably pushing 85 years old and had glasses thicker than a Harry Potter book. He drove in the middle of the road the entire time and cars were honking and he was swerving all over. I was so happy when we jumped out of the cab alive. He was a REALLY nice cab drive, but a REALLY bad driver. We were cracking up in the back, but still a little nervous for our safety. He also kept saying “know what I mean?” after every sentence. He probably said it about 100 times in fifteen minutes. He was a talker!  Such a fun experience.

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

Sunday morning, we bundled up and went to church in Georgetown.

After church we went to Ristorante Piccolo for brunch. It’s an adorable little italian restaurant on a side street. We were the first ones at the restaurant and didn’t realize they didn’t open for another 30 minutes. The chef stopped us from walking out and told us that the kitchen was ready and he’d be delighted to serve us. I thought that was so nice of him.

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

We had the perfect seat. We sat in the front little corner window. This place was very cozy! We started with coffee 🙂

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

I loved how strong their coffee was. Strong coffee is the way to my heart.

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C. Polenta Con Ragu D' Agnello

The brunch had two courses.

My friend ordered the Polenta Con Ragu D’ Agnello. It’s a slow simmered lamb ragu served over soft polenta. I always try his dishes, so I can confirm it’s delicious.

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

I went with their caesar salad for my first course. I usually do dressing on the side, but their caesar dressing was the best caesar dressing I’ve ever had. I feel like Caesar dressing is a hit or miss.

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

My friend ordered the Frittata ai Frutti di Mare for his second course. It was an Italian omelet stuffed with shrimp, sea scallops, bell pepper, fontina cheese and parsley, served with fresh fruits and Italian bread.

All I can say is that Ralph has some competition… Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

I ordered the Asparagi con Uova e Pancetta which was a classic eggs benedict of poached eggs and pancetta bacon over bread, drizzled with a light hollandaise sauce and shaved Pecorino Romano cheese, served with steamed asparagus tips and fries.

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

This breakfast was a dream. Usually he orders the Benedict and I order the omelet. We pretty much eat each others meals anyways.

Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C. Ristorante Piccolo Georgetown Washington D.C.

When it’s warmer, you can sit outside up on the balcony.

Baked & Wired Washington D.C. Georgetown  Baked & Wired Washington D.C. Georgetown

We headed to Baked and Wired after breakfast. It’s one of my favorite spots in D.C. I love the humor in this place.

Baked & Wired Washington D.C. Georgetown

It was kind of early for dessert but you can’t go to Baked and Wired without getting a treat.

Baked & Wired Washington D.C. Georgetown

They had way too many to choose from!

Baked & Wired Washington D.C. Georgetown

We went with the Soccer Mom’s bar. It’s basically a seven layer bar.

Baked & Wired Washington D.C. Georgetown

The bar was really good, but their cupcake from last time was better.

Baked & Wired Washington D.C. Georgetown

We split a caramel cappuccino too 🙂 YUM!

Exploring Georgetown Washington D.C.

We ended up walking miles and miles around Georgetown.

Dean & Deluca Georgetown

We also stopped at Dean & Deluca to pick up some treats for the family.

Exploring Georgetown Washington D.C.

I showed him some of my favorite shops, the exorcist stairs, and Georgetown Cupcake.

ALexandria va onebar

We headed back to to the apartment and hung out with my brother for a bit!

Alexandria VA Virtue Feed & Grain

Later that night we I headed down to King Street to watch the Carolina Game. We really wanted to watch it at Virtue Feed & Grain, but they didn’t have the NFL package so we went to Bugsys. We figured we’d split an appetizer over there and split dinner at Virtue Feed & Grain after the game.

Alexandria VA Virtue Feed & Grain

If it were me, I’d just walk around all day taking pictures. I’m obsessed with this place.

Alexandria VA waterfront

The sun was going down over the water, so we walked over to watch it set before heading over to Bugsys.

Alexandria VA waterfront

You could see the National Harbor over the bridge.

Alexandria VA waterfront Alexandria VA waterfront Alexandria VA waterfront Alexandria VA Virtue Feed & Grain Alexandria VA Bugsys

We ordered the crab dip and I had a glass of wine while we watched the game.

Alexandria Bugsys

It was a great win for the Panthers!

Alexandria VA Virtue Feed & Grain

We started out with some fried calamari at Virtue Feed & Grain. I actually didn’t plan on eating any becuase I was still full from breakfast. The waitress said they were the best, so my friend ordered them. I had one bite and couldn’t believe how freaking good they were. They had fried jalapeños mixed in them too. The breading was what made them so good.

Alexandria VA Virtue Feed & Grain

We decided to split a meal. I let my friend pick since I wasn’t that hungry. He went with the New York Strip and their mac & cheese. The steak was good, but their mac and cheese was probably the best I’ve ever had.

The restaurant was really good, we loved our waitress, and the atmosphere was very warm and rustic.

Alexandria Virginia King Street

We walked around a little after dinner and then jumped on the Trolly to head back to the apartment.

Alexandria Virginia King Street

It was such a fun trip in D.C.!

Alexandria Virginia King Street

gorgeous cat

I woke up around seven and headed to say goodbye to my brother. We left for Baltimore around ten to meet up with my friend’s cousin. He’s a cop here…and in a really bad area…

How cute is there cat? I really want a cat now.

Baltimore Maryland

He drove us around Baltimore in some of the most terrifying areas. I can’t even repeat the stuff that I learned/saw today on this blog. It just makes me feel pretty grateful for my life and the way I was brought up. It’s a scary and sad world out there.

Baltimore Maryland

Baltimore Maryland

Even though there are some really scary parts of Baltimore, there are some really gorgeous parts too!

Baltimore Maryland

He took us all around the downtown, the college areas, and some really nice neighborhoods.

Baltimore Maryland

This is the home of Under Amour!

Baltimore Maryland

I can’t wait to come back in the summer so we can walk around. It was 30 degrees yesterday with winds! YIKES!

stoney river towson

We went to lunch at Stoney River in Towson. It’s located in such a cute little area and connected to a GIANT mall!

stoney river

The restaurant was so cozy! We sat right next to the fireplace.

It was 2pm and the only thing in our stomachs was coffee, so we were hungry! The little basket of rolls were heavenly. They were fried, gooey and I could have eaten the whole basket!

crab cakes stoney river

You can’t go to Baltimore without getting a crab cake.

We started out with a delicious crab cake on a plate of mango salsa and mustard sauce. So delicious!

kale salad at stoney river

I ordered the Baby Kale Salad. It has toasted almonds and dried cranberries tossed in a delicious herb vinaigrette. All the salads I’ve had at restaurants lately have been on point! This one was so good! I really wish I could make salad dressings just as good.

kale salad at stoney river

After dinner, we walked around the giant mall! It was so hard not to shop.

Nordstrom coffee

We grabbed coffee at Nordstrom and then headed back to their place! Walking back to the car was miserable. I hate the cold and never want to get used to it!

PIZZA MONDAYS

Around 8:30pm we had pizza and salad for dinner. They have this thing called “pizza mondays” and that slice of pizza was freaking good! I’m so glad my running starts back up today!

The Bachelor

We watched the Bachelor…

I really like Ben as the Bachelor, but some of his rose choices were definitely pushed by the producers. What do you guys think?

Three Questions For You!

  1. Did you watch the Bachelor?
  2. Are you ready for Spring?
  3. How are your New Year’s Resolutions holding up?

Comments

  • FG

    WOW how unfortunate that you are clueless. Very impressed with responses to your small minded blog on your visit to Baltimore. I am sure you will be voting for DT. You need an education on societal issues and responses to same. Hope you take time to learn about the world you live in. I am really not surprised just really offended and saddened. You have so much to learn. So much more to see. Maybe if you seek a higher education stretch your mind and by all means pray. God bless you. OH YEAH WILL NOT BE LOOKING AT THIS BLOG SO KEEP MY ADDRESS TO INFORM ME AS YOU LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WORLD YOU LIVE IN.

    Reply to FG
  • linda

    commenters are cray

    Reply to linda
  • Anonymous

    bitches aint shit but

    Reply to Anonymous
  • regan

    hi taralynn! i live in Baltimore 🙂

    Reply to regan
  • whiney

    i love you taralynn

    Reply to whiney
  • Hannah

    You are way smarter than people take you for. Very impressed with your knowledge and ability to stand up to these pathetic morons.

    Reply to Hannah
  • Lindsy

    Hilarious comments. People are pathetic!

    Reply to Lindsy
  • K

    vg

    Reply to K
  • Alice

    Yes, people are indeed too politically correct for their own good. It’s becoming a huge problem. I am not a Trump supporter; I think many of his comments are tasteless towards minorities and others however I think he makes a valid point in bringing to the forefront of public consciousness the awareness that perhaps we are becoming too politically correct in such a way that we contribute to our own detriment. “Check your privilege” quite frankly is a ridiculous sentiment. I am all for tolerance, but the extent that this country has gone to in order to address this issue has morphed into a sort of reverse racism. Affirmative action for example has gone way too far; quotas for university admissions should not exist. We should operate on merit rather than “thanks for participating- you all get trophies just for showing up kids.” I realize that others are not afforded the same opportunities as their counterparts, but let’s give them the tools to change rather than handouts.

    Stop insulting Tara for her grammar, body, etc. She is entitled to her own beliefs and you are not helping the legitimacy of your case by slandering her. She is not perfect and neither are you; don’t bother reading her blog if you are going to waste your time on Earth by demonizing another human.

    Reply to Alice
  • Cat North

    It is very sad that people want to be so blind to the truth. Baltimore has beautiful parts but it is a very scary, and very unsafe city in many parts also. I got really annoyed reading these comments with all of these people who think they know everything about everything. But anyways everyone is entitled to their own opinion but when people start name calling and personal attacks that is when their opinion becomes invalid and should be ignored. I think you did a great job describing this city keep up the good work girlfriend (:

    Reply to Cat North
  • Lisa

    I feel sorry for the people insulting Taralynn. Everyone has the right to disagree with what she puts in her public blog, however, when you resort to name calling YOU are the one in the wrong. In all the years I have read her blog, she has never insulted a person or tried to body shame someone. Readers are trying to insinuate she is the horrible person for saying a city had scary parts but in the same breath you are calling her fat. For one, she is far from overweight, so why even say it? Secondly, how can a person develop such strong emotions towards a complete stranger?? Makes me think some of the mean people may be ex-friends of hers. If you think she is such a terrible blogger, don’t read what she writes. I think that she does a good job and tries to be honest in her posts. I did not see the Trump pic on IG but she has a right to her political opinions. She has a brother in the military so I’m sure she tries to stay educated on the different candidates. Leave her alone and try to spend your energy on things to better your own life.

    Reply to Lisa
  • Torie

    I’ve been reading your blog for about two years, and I’ve never felt the need to comment until now. What some of these commenters are missing is just because you felt scared in a poverty stricken neighborhood does not mean you’re ignoring the issues happening there or claiming it’s a bad city. Yes, a lot of poverty stricken areas lack the resources and care of the government; and yes, there are neighborhoods with a long history of racism and segregation;, and yes, there are people that feel they have no choice but to steal, sell drugs, etc. to provide for their families. That doesn’t excuse the vandalism of private or public property, trash improperly disposed on the streets, and other things that reflect poorly on a neighborhood. It also most definitely does not excuse murder, rape, or any other horrific crime. I understand what’s morally right and wrong is not something that’s necessarily instilled in us, and many of these people don’t know any different, HOWEVER, that still does not excuse these actions. These neighborhoods are in dire need of help (better education, housing, more job opportunities, etc.), and I know that’s something we all agree on. Let’s focus on that and offer solutions on how to help instead of attacking someone for what they do or don’t know on the subject.

    And if Taralynn or anyone else wants to describe a place as “terrifying” they have every right to do so. I live and work in a downtown area of a major metro city.. I walk by homeless men and women regularly, some are nice and it breaks my heart when I see them and others are angry and completely out of it punching, kicking, screaming profanities at anyone who walks by.. it makes for an unpredictable and sometimes scary experience as I do not know which I will encounter on my walk to and from work. That does not mean the city is a bad place, it just means I have my guard up because there is more potential for scary situations, thus making it “scary” sometimes.

    My point in saying all this is Taralynn, you are not wrong and it is ok to have a different opinion. Xoxo

    Reply to Torie
  • VioletaG

    OMG TARALYNN, so you can´t be wrong in your comments, you can´t have your own opinion, you can´t write whatever you want but THEY can offend you, attack you and they can call you ignorant, Idiot, etc. Before judge they should learn to be PERFECT and not try to change they way you think or felt that day. I´m mexican and when someone tells me that my country is very dangerous is because thats the only thing they heard or know about Mexico, even politics from US are ignorant and they call us Drug dealers and Rapers etc. Did these rude people on your blog sent them a letter judging their comments? Who knos right? And I dont judge people when they think Mexico is only Drugs, trafficants, rapers, and ugly country as in the american movies shows, I tell them ALL THE GREAT THINGS WE HAVE HERE AND INVITE THEM TO EXPERIENCE IT and you wrote in this post that you want to go back to Baltimore to see the great things it has, and these rude people are taking this opportunity to bring other things out about you and judge you.
    I think the only thing here is that you need to be careful with the words in your posts, you have “followers” that are only waiting for your mistakes

    AND SORRY FOR MY GRAMMAR IN ENGLISH I´M NOT PERFECT

    Reply to VioletaG
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Thank you so much Violeta!! & I’d love to come visit your country! Ive only been to Cancun, but I’d love to see Mexico from a NON-VACATIONAL spot 🙂 xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Helena

    Dear Tara,

    I’m impressed that you did not delete some nasty comments your “followers” left. I don’t understand why those people who disagree with your point of view and/or were “offended/insulted” by your post have to respond by insulting you. It is not OK to call someone an IDIOT just because they are not as knowledgeable as someone else. There is a right and wrong way to go about expressing your opinion. You can educate someone without INSULTING them. Bottom Line: Your heart was in the right place and the people who insulted you sound as though they are just jealous of what you have.
    In other words, even if what you said was “wrong”, those people who insulted you lost all their credibility when they lashed out on you.
    Tara: Just don’t insult them back. Handle them by asking questions and learning!

    Reply to Helena
  • Jen

    Love your blog and even though we don’t agree on EVERYTHING (boo panthers! 😉) I always appreciate your recaps, your photography, and your recipes of course! Baltimore does have extremely bad parts to it- and it’s perfectly okay to talk about them or else they’ll never change! Just because people want to live in ignorance doesn’t mean we should tiptoe around them and I’m glad you are levelheaded enough to handle the argumentative types with tact.

    My husband is a police officer in a very bad city and he sees firsthand the ugliness of not just people’s situations but the attitudes and choices that got them there in the first place. Being poor or having less doesn’t give anyone the excuse to act a fool and morals, not money, is what gives us the knowledge of right and wrong. Those who say differently are just looking for an excuse.

    Keep up the good work, girl, and never stop praying.

    Reply to Jen
  • Emily S.

    I think it is very sad and unfortunate that everyone is so offended by your post. This is your blog and you should be able to write about whatever you want! I have been to Baltimore before and did not feel comfortable or safe there. Don’t ever apologize for your opinion! All of these people getting offended need to open their eyes and realize that Baltimore is truly a rough area, and it is clear as day if you’ve ever walked around the city. Everyone is so obsessed with being politically correct and tiptoeing around races – thats ridiculous. If they took a second to look around they would realize what kind of people live there and what they’re about. Keep doing you Taralynn! All of these people wish they could be as successful and amazing as you. Don’t let them bother you 🙂 I have looked up to you for years and will continue to! Xoxoxox

    Reply to Emily S.
  • Ellie

    Don’t let the viciousness of these commentors leave a sour taste in your mouth about Baltimore – they do not provide a good representation of the city. Of course it’s rife with deep economic, social, and criminal issues, but (as you were not able to explore in-depth, but did mention) it’s full of beauty, charm, and the nicest people of any city I’ve been in (which has been a lot). I understand the validity of discussing these issues, but I hope you can separate them from Charm City when you come back in the summer!

    I live to the edge of downtown, on the edge of a bad neighborhood. I love living here, and it’s hard for locals to not to get touchy and defensive when the city we love spent a whole year being maligned on a national level. It’s so easy to spew hate on the internet – when you visit, you’ll see Baltimore has a lot of love!

    Some more suggestions to visit:
    Fells Point and Hampden are my favorite neighborhoods. A game at Camden Yards and a visit to the Aquarium are excellent – you can walk from one to the other in the Inner Harbor (best view of the harbor is on Federal Hill). The best crabcakes are at Faidley’s, Thames St Oyster House, and Phillips Seafood (Jimmy’s Famous is also excellent, but a little farther away). The Walters, BMA, AVAM, Fort McHenry, and the Historic Ships are great for art & history.

    Also, I’ll leave this one for you: http://sprudge.com/a-coffee-lovers-guide-to-baltimore-81063.html

    Enjoy!

    Reply to Ellie
  • Carly

    I love reading your recap posts especially when you travel to different places. I was shocked to see how many rude comments that were left on this post because people chose to intemperate your experience in a negative light. I enjoyed this post as I did many others and understand that it is your perspective on your experience and as a lifestyle blog that is exactly what you should be writing about. I hope the negative response does not turn you off of blogging as much as you do… I look forward to your next post as always! Happy new year!

    Reply to Carly
  • Mel

    Taralynn, I am pretty surprised with the comments being thrown out here. I don’t think you should even address the ignorant attacks at you. I have followed your blog for a few years. I can relate to healthy eating and disordered relationships with food. I enjoy looking at your recipes and the anecdotes about your life. Anyone in a situation that they are not used to being in will be uncomfortable. Most do not blog about their life and I think that your expressing your honest opinion is fine. Don’t let the haters get to you. It seems as though people are out to attack everything you post. Just focus on you and ignore the hate. They are taking time out of their lives to purposefully bring others down. How is that any better than what they are “accusing” you of?

    Reply to Mel
  • Anonymous

    Taralynn….keep on posting….your experiences and your opinions make you unique and wonderful and I enjoy reading your posts. As for my New Years resolutions I am 4 days into a 30 day walking challenge….I have decided to think about as 3 10 day challenges to make it easier!:) by the way, I made a spinach avocado salad with an orange poppyseed dressing this holiday season that people are still asking for…it was fantastic!

    Reply to Anonymous
  • Chloe

    We are way too focused on being PC these days. Chill people. I get the hometown pride thing, but let’s be honest, every town has its scary bits and some towns are a bit rougher than others. Don’t read it if you disagree with her. End of story.

    Also, grammar people, I understand the desire to pull out the red pen every time someone spells something wrong. But then I remember my manners. And those are much more important.

    Bachelor. Yes! Phony or not, I feel like this is going to be the best season yet!

    Reply to Chloe
  • Ashley

    I don’t agree with everything you said, but that doesn’t mean you owe anyone an apology. It seems like people just look for things to pick on you for. Why do they visit your blog then? God forbid you express an opinion about a city that is less than glowing. Hang in there!

    Reply to Ashley
  • Jamie

    Hi, I don’t mean to sound like a jerk but for someone who writes for a living I just have to gently remind you that “because” is spelled b-e-c-a-u-s-e. You’ve been spelling it incorrectly for a long time now as b-e-c-u-a-s-e and it really reflects poorly in your writing style.

    Reply to Jamie
  • Eleanor

    In regards to the photo of the person sitting on the stoop: I want you to reimagine this scenario.

    You come across a blog written by someone from another country. In that blog, they write about how sad it is to see all the obesity in the United States. Underneath that paragraph about how sad and scary the obesity problem is in the U.S., you find an uncaptioned photo of yourself, one that you didn’t know someone had taken. Just stop to think for a minute. What would that imply about you? How would that make you feel?

    Reply to Eleanor
    • ashley

      Eleanor: that’s an excellent point. Exactly what I was trying (not as well as you!) to get across in my own comments to Tara.

      Reply to ashley
  • Jessica

    I agree with did you nothing wrong with your comments. Hell, when I go to these places and see poverty I think the same thing Taralynn. It makes me appreciate what I have more. Anyways, I’m glad you had a good time in DC again, I love reading about your DC trips because my aunt and cousin just moved to the area last year and I have been to DC more times than I can count. While I have done all the monument stuff you mentioned, I love reading your recommendations about restaurants because we never know where to eat. So thank you for that. Little side note for you to keep in mind next year… At Arlington Cemetery the second Saturday in December you can volunteer to help put out the wreaths at the gravesides. It’s great that you took a picture of that because this year and last year my aunt and I helped place the wreaths. I know you’re not one for the cold but it’s definitely an experience.

    Reply to Jessica
  • Amber

    Hello Taralynn,
    Looks like you had a wonderful time in D.C. and I look forward to seeing more of Baltimore of when you revisit the city. As a longtime reader (and a WOC), I’ve never found anything that posted to be offensive. It’s really said to see to that in these comments, people are too focused on trying to prove a point, tear someone else down to so , or both, instead of trying to be a change for better for in the world.

    Reply to Amber
  • Kate

    Offering an apology to those you unknowingly offended would show that you have grace and understanding towards another point of view.

    Reply to Kate
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I did nothing wrong and we live in a world where we are forced to be “politically correct” or sensitive becuase people are too easily offended. I did nothing wrong. I’m not going to be forced into an apology when it’s not necessary.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Laura

        Never apologizing isn’t an asset, it’s a detriment, especially to personal growth. You’re getting DOZENS of comments, some with very insightful commentary, and linking scholarly articles to back up why what you’re saying is harmful, and your only response is “I’m not wrong so I won’t apologize, neener neener neener.” That’s doesn’t show character strength, it shows weakness. And honestly, makes you seem quite dense. I can tell this one comment isn’t going to change your mind, but I really wish you would take some time to reflect and educate yourself, particularly because you have a fairly large public platform – by way of your “personal blog.”

        Reply to Laura
        • Laura

          Oh, and I should say, the post itself isn’t AS bad (though, some criticism was warranted), but the comments you leave later on just dig you into a MUCH deeper whole.

          Reply to Laura
      • Abbie

        Admitting to doing something wrong and showing that you reflect viewpoint aren’t the same thing, but I’m not surprised you’re too selfish to realize that.

        Reply to Abbie
      • fake name

        **BECAUSE OMFG.

        Reply to fake name
  • Lindsay

    It is crazy to me how many people seem to want to pick apart everything you say and do and treat you like shit because they don’t have anything better to do. You seem like an awesome person and I hope you keep posting the same way you always do with YOUR opinions and experiences. I think your blog is great and I really appreciate the good attitude you keep even amongst so many haters. 🙂

    Reply to Lindsay
  • CMcc

    Tara,
    I know this is not how you meant for your post to sound, but this is how it read: “I went to all these great places and ate delicious food and had coffee. Then, I went on this scary police ride, and saw unfortunate people on drugs. I’m so glad I’ve been blessed!”
    Please, just take a second to think about this. I’m not insulting you, or suggesting your feelings of being scared are wrong. I just want you to understand how it looks to some people.
    To answer your questions:
    No, I don’t watch the Bachelor. I hate the entire premise of it! 😉
    I would love it to SNOW
    No resolutions, except to drink more green smoothies
    Take care, and have a happy (COLD) Thursday!

    Reply to CMcc
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Or what about these comments on my blog “there are some really gorgeous parts too!”

      “He took us all around the downtown, the college areas, and some really nice neighborhoods.”

      “This is the home of Under Amour!”

      “I can’t wait to come back in the summer so we can walk around. It was 30 degrees yesterday with winds! YIKES!”

      “We went to lunch at Stoney River in Towson. It’s located in such a cute little area and connected to a GIANT mall!”

      I mentioned good parts of Baltimore as well. But, Im not going to repeat myself over and over again in the comments.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Sarah

    It is quite obvious you are creating fake replies to people who bring up very valid points. Why don’t you just apologize and move on with your life?

    I used to be a loyal reader, but after this I am no longer. You have some growing up to do.

    Reply to Sarah
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I don’t need to create fake accounts. I can easily say what I want to say under my name. Why would I apologize if I don’t believe I should? I did nothing wrong. It’s ridiculous.

      Best of luck.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Silvia

    Never let such negative comments to affect you! I know it’s easier to take negative stuff than positive, but please stay the same as you are and don’t let anyone to ruin even a moment of your happiness, people will always talk no matter what and how you would do!But there is nothing wrong with you, most likely they have problems in their lives! Just let it go, at this very moment! 🙂

    Reply to Silvia
  • Lauren

    Taralynn, i understand why some people were offended, but at the same time, i don’t even know you, and i know that you didn’t mean any harm by it.

    I am not sure why people are so mean, but you don’t deserve that.

    Many people (including myself) still love your blog! keep it coming 🙂

    Reply to Lauren
  • Amber Taylor

    I was thinking what a great post this way and how I appreciate your honesty about the ride along with your cop friend. Then I read the comments. SERIOUSLY PEOPLE?! Tara is writing about her experience, her life, on her blog. The fact that you have the gull to say she is ignorant because she was open and honest about her experience makes the commenter sound ignorant, not Tara. I bet every single one of the negative Nancy commenters are out there saving the world, helping the down trodden, supporting local communities and volunteering at shelters-right? Because why else would you comment and be a total butt wipe about her experience if you weren’t 100% fixing the problem? All this negativity is what makes good people like Tara and other bloggers stop blogging and I for one think that would be a shame because I enjoy her posts and her opinions because I know they are her opinions (because I am educated like). If you don’t like them, don’t read her posts. But don’t comment just to be a troll because you have your own personal issues that you clearly need help with.

    Reply to Amber Taylor
    • Cyndi

      “I bet every single one of the negative Nancy commenters are out there saving the world, helping the down trodden, supporting local communities and volunteering at shelters-right?”

      I haven’t left a comment yet but I’m about to. First of all, after graduating I worked for a women’s shelter and I now work for an international aid agency. In my spare time I volunteer at a homeless shelter. So I hope that you will now take me seriously. Second of all, one of the things that’s become so clear to me in my paid work and advocacy work is that stereotypes and generalizations harm vulnerable communities.

      Aside from 2 or 3 trolls, every single so-called “negative” comment here has politely encouraged Taralynn to educate herself on the issues facing people who live in poverty and that it’s not as simplistic as she paints it. If Taralynn is all for freedom of speech, shouldn’t she welcome these viewpoints instead of telling them to go read someone else’s blog or toughen up and stop being so sensitive?

      Taralynn, I’ve read your blog for years. I’m really disappointed you won’t grow up and admit when you are wrong to your faithful readers. It’s the mature and right thing to do. A simple “wow, thank you, I have not looked at it from this light before” would suffice. i think as a young woman, there’s no harm to educate yourself on these issues. In fact, I hope you will consider taking a university course that could offer you some insight into these issues. I won’t be returning to your blog, but you’ll probably be happy to see me go since you don’t seem to like anyone commenting who has an opinion that differs from yours.

      Reply to Cyndi
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Thank you Amber!!!

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Kay

    It’s pretty clear you’ve hurt and offended some readers with parts of this post, Tara. Even if it wasn’t your intention (and I sincerely don’t think it was), why haven’t you taken any responsibility for it?

    When you hurt someone, the right thing to do is to apologize and ask questions about what you did to hurt them in order to educate yourself and try to prevent it from happening in the future.

    Reply to Kay
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Kay,

      I feel like the problem with America is that we have to sugar coat everything just so people can convince themselves that everything around them is made of glitter and diamonds. People need to toughen up. I get 100+ negative comments day calling me fat, stupid, ignorant, worthless, ugly, old, greasy, failure, and if I let those things bother me or affect the way I live my life I’d be a mess. I’m not upset by anything that people said to me and I’m not going to ask anyone who called me “ignorant” to apologize. If they want to believe I’m ignorant, that is one them. That doesn’t bother me at all. 933 shootings and over 300 homicides shows that there are terrible and scary parts to the city and people don’t like to hear that. I wouldn’t call a murderer a good person I am not going to call the hood a good area. I think some people need to toughen up, or stop pretending to be so offended by everything. It’s more believable that people are bored and want to argue rather than actually being offended.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Eleanor

        “I am not going to call the hood a good area.”

        The fact that you use the term “hood” means you really are completely unaware of the language you use.

        Reply to Eleanor
      • Kay

        Thanks for your reply, I appreciate the time and thought you put into your response. There are certainly comments in this thread that are trying to upset you, but I think there are some good ones that are just asking you to reconsider your opinions or think about how your blog post might be taken in a larger context. It takes a lot of maturity to reflect on our beliefs or actions and come to the realization that some of them might be wrong.

        You sound very defensive here and resistant to any type of reflection. I don’t know if that’s how you are in “real life” or if it’s how you feel you must respond online in order to protect yourself. I certainly hope you aren’t this way with people close to you. I imagine your friends and family would be very hurt if you offended them and then didn’t care.

        Reply to Kay
      • Rae

        Nobody said you shouldn’t present negative things on your blog. People are offended that you think it’s ok to comment about issues of poverty and drug abuse in such a passing, trivial, and frankly, as I’ve seen you act in the comments, judgmental manner.

        I don’t think you’ll ever be able to see anyone else’s point of view but your own, but you should try. If you can recognize your own privilege you should realize that just as many forces put you where you are as put the people in the “hood” where they are. Life in America (since we are generalizing) isn’t all pulling yourself up by your bootstraps to become “successful.” Some people have the cards stacked against them. This is complex. I don’t think you understand how hurtful your attitude is.

        Reply to Rae
  • Eleanor

    Just have to say…I have a hard time believing you’ve really “dug into the issues” in relation to Baltimore when you can’t even get the names of the places you visited right on your blog. The restaurant in D.C. is FOUNDING Farmers. It’s Arlington National Cemetery, not The Arlington Cemetery. If you can’t even get the tiny details right then you lose credibility.

    Reply to Eleanor
  • Heather

    Hi Taralynn! Loved the recap. It looks like y’all had a great time. Also looks like 2016 will be another year where everyone is offended by absolutely everything. Happy New Year to you!

    Reply to Heather
  • Brooklyn

    I don’t think I have ever seen so many comments on one of your posts before, awesome for you!!
    I only set a few goals for this year and so far they are coming along pretty good I think 🙂
    All of your photos in this post are so good it looks like it was an amazing trip!
    http://Www.justbeingbrooklyn.com

    Reply to Brooklyn
  • Kelsey

    1.Did you watch the Bachelor?
    I was so glad the bachelor is back on I think Ben is super sweet and sincere I love the fact he wanted to wait before he kissed lace(thank goodness she seems crazzzzy!) but it just shows he wants to get to know someone before just diving in and kissing everyone right off the bat. I don’t see how they do it I couldn’t imagine kissing that many people or remembering all their names haha espcially with those two twins. I love the ciala girl and the girl who is the only mom I think her name is Amanda. I think it was crazy that he kept the rose girl and lace and the girl who can’t even speak english. I wanted to throw my remote at the tv when he kept her! :///

    2.Are you ready for Spring?
    I am so ready for spring to be here I hate having to worry about my windows freezing over and starting my car before I go to work. I miss the warm weather 🙁

    3.How are your New Year’s Resolutions holding up?
    I wanted to start fresh on a Monday so I didn’t start until the 4th but I have been eating better and not as much and strictly drinking water and I did my first arm workout yesterday and lets just say it’s been awhile because my arms are so sore 🙁 And it was just a basic easy workout lol I hope I can keep going I have made a group on facebook to help me and others stay motivated.

    I am sorry for all these awful comments you have been getting but I didn’t find anything wrong with what you said and I love reading your posts I hope one day to travel the world too. 🙂

    Reply to Kelsey
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I can’t stand Lace!! ugh. I actually like Jubilee ( i probably didn’t spell her name right) and the girl that he gave the first rose to. I have a feeling he gets some kind of name memos in an ear piece haha. I don’t know how he does it. I like the girl who is a mom of two as well! He did stuff for ratings/producers for sure!!I feel like he gets to pick his favorites and they get to pick some girls. I MEAN IT DOES MAKE GREAT TELEVISION…

      I CANT WAIT FOR SPRING EITHER!!

      I decided to start today instead of on my trip! I’m with you on the sore arms. I did Jillian michaels today!

      & thank you! Don’t be sorry love. They really don’t bother me at all!
      xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Brooke

    I want to go to DC so badly now! I’ll be referring to your blog when I finally make it out there. 🙂

    Also – The Bachelor! OMG! My friends and I make brackets every season and played “bengo” (our take on bingo) for the premier. I definitely did not agree with some of his rose choices, but I do have some favorites already! This will be an interesting season, for sure.

    Reply to Brooke
    • Taralynn McNitt

      D.C. IS GREAT!:)

      BENGO! I love it. My friends and I have decided to get together every monday for the show!! :)I agree with you on the choices! 😀 xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Jessie @ The Acquired Sass

    La la la, just over here LOL’ing at everybody leaving ridiculously rude comments & making fools of themselves above. & then realizing how sensitive people are.

    I come here ’cause I like pictures of coffee & random life updates & the occasional recipe that I PIN but somehow always forget to make. And because puppy pictures rock.

    I am very educated on things like poverty, affordable housing, & all the connections between them. I’ve done fairly extensive research as well as volunteer work & fundraising. I’ve also been to Baltimore & some parts are all sorts of scary. Shrugs. It’s just a thing. Being educated does not exempt you from being a victim of crime. SO…you do you girl & I’ll keep coming back for the food pics & life updates. 🙂

    Oh, & my resolution to do 10 pushups & 10 squats every day is going strong!

    Reply to Jessie @ The Acquired Sass
  • nikita khara

    Tara.

    I am really sad and disheartened by your comments here. Clearly a lot of your readers are offended and are stating their issues with what you have written. Obviously everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but your responses are coming across so snarky and and crude. These are the readers who fund your lifestyle. Just ignore the people who are clearly trolling, but also take into consideration what people are saying. I too found some of your comments to be very ignorant. And if you are just not educated on a subject, that is totally fine! But to be a little naive on a subject, know that, and choose not to look more into the subject or at least admit your lack of awareness on a subject is not right.

    Reply to nikita khara
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I thank you for your opinion but to be completely honest it is very judgmental for you to say that I am not educated on a subject when you do not personally know me, my educational level, my personal beliefs or my lifestyle other than what I allow you to see on my blog. To say that I need to cater to certain people because they “fund” my lifestyle is also completely false. I have dug into the issues in this area, this post was not about what issues are plaguing Baltimore it’s social and economic structure, the failures of the United States public education system, The Baltimore City Police Department, or even the crack addicts who are hanging out on the corner begging for money so that they can buy more drugs. It was about my personal feelings as I drove through an area. To anyone who says that I was going on a poverty tour they are wrong. To the people who are offended by the way I felt as I was driving through a poverty stricken area where crime was literally happening on every corner and pretty much in any direction that I looked I will not apologize for those feelings. Those were my feelings as I saw this area. To ask me to apologize for my feelings is actually ridiculous and childish. I never once said the people in these areas are bad people or judged them in any way. I never even said that they had the same opportunities as myself or other people born into better situations. What I did say was that I do have sympathy for them and would love to figure out a way to change the culture in these places. However, to anyone who turns to drugs as their form of “escape” I will not use their situation or up bringing as an excuse. Can a situation and upbringing being a contributing factor? yes it can. However, I have never met a person who became addicted to crack without CHOOSING to try crack. (yes I know some babies are born with addictions because of their mothers using while pregnant, I am not referring to them when I say there is an initial choice. I also know some people have accidents happen or get injected with the drug I also am not referring to these people). Once you try something and become addicted it acts like a disease and you just have to have it and you will do pretty much anything to get it. I understand it changes and ruins life. I understand the war on drugs was started by the United States and many of these neighborhoods had crack pumped into them because of the United States. I know all of this. But at the end of the day, most of us if not all of us have a choice of what we inject or put into our bodies as far as drugs and alcohol are concerned. Do I feel bad and want the best for anyone struggling with addiction? Absolutely, but I am not going to say the reason they are an addict is because of the environment they grew up in. There are many many people from similar situations that made something of themselves and did not become addicts or drug dealers or criminals. I know a lot of people from similar situations that are successful and talking with them most of them agree with myself.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Helena

        Your “followers” read way too much into your post. Excellent response!!

        Reply to Helena
      • Kelley

        Girl, we can tell how “educated” you are by your grammar, spelling and overall writing ability alone. You’re an insecure moron.

        Reply to Kelley
      • nikita khara

        oh goodness im not saying to cater to them at all, but maybe make sure your responses seem less snide/mocking. Also I didn’t mean you personally as uneducated in terms of if you have/don’t have an educated. Just in a sense of if you’re familiar with a subject. And once again, didn’t mean you personally, just people in general.

        Basically I meant take into consideration WHY your readers were offended and maybe make sure your responses don’t sound as snide. Also, I didn’t bring up any actual content such as drugs, socioeconomic status etc lol. I was more uneasy about the WAY you responded to some people vs your post’s content.

        Sorry for any confusion lol

        Reply to nikita khara
        • Taralynn McNitt

          I don’t think my comments are snide/mocking. I think it’s the way you’re reading them in your head. I’m not trying to go out of my way to sound like a rude person. I’m actually a very nice person.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Jay

        Dear Tara,

        It’s not for you to decided whether or not you are ignorant. Most people are ignorant of their own ignorance, and you certainly are due to your high level of privilege. If dozens of readers are coming here to inform you that you’re out of line, PERHAPS CONSIDER THAT YOU ACTUALLY ARE.

        Reply to Jay
        • Taralynn McNitt

          I do not believe that I am out of line and I will not just go back on my words becuase it offended people. That is not the kind of person I am. I don’t understand how it’s ok to push your beliefs on me (and expect me to agree with you) when I’m ok with agreeing to disagree. I’m not forcing or begging people to read my blog. It’s my blog and I believe in saying what I feel and if you do not like it, that is fine, you do not have to read it. You can call me ignorant as many times as you’d like, but that does not keep me up at night or change any of my views.

          Have a great day.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Erica

            You spelled BECAUSE becuase 5 times on this page. Are you really in college? Seriously? It’s like this on all your other blog posts too. You really need to learn how to proof read and do a spelling/grammar check. It’s extremely unprofessional.

            Reply to Erica
          • fake name

            BECAUSE******** OMG LEARN TO FUCKING SPELL.

            Reply to fake name
      • taylor

        “But at the end of the day, most of us if not all of us have a choice of what we inject or put into our bodies as far as drugs and alcohol are concerned”

        pretty sure your dog didn’t have a choice when you fed him beer this summer…man you are really helping with the war on drugs and alcohol.

        Reply to taylor
  • Morgan L.

    Geez! These comments from people are so awful and judgmental! Charlotte may not have as much crime, but in no way would I be offended if someone wrote something negative about our city. We are all entitled to our opinions and the opinions we form from experiences. I work in west Charlotte which is one of the highest crime areas in the city and I see my fair share of crazy things. If someone visited this area of Charlotte and didn’t explore elsewhere, they would definitely say similar things about the city.

    Reply to Morgan L.
  • Emily

    LOL- People are so sensitive! I love your blog Taralynn so keep on blogging and taking pictures of whatever the hell you want!

    Reply to Emily
  • ashley

    Um, you did:
    “He drove us around Baltimore in some of the most terrifying areas…it’s a scary and sad world out there [picture of person on stoop]”

    Reply to ashley
  • Maddie

    Dear Taralynn,
    I just wanted to say I have been reading your blog for about two months and you have been such a huge inspiration to me. I just wanted to thank you for sharing yourself and your experiences so openly on your blog. Reading your posts have really uplifted me in some bad times. You are an incredible role model and I just wanted to reach out and let you know how awesome you are. Lots of love and blessings from Northern California!!!
    Maddie

    Reply to Maddie
  • Anne

    This was an awesome post! Thanks for sharing your cool adventures (I would loooove to explore all the places you have), but more importantly thanks for being so great and for being true to YOURself. Keep on keeping on – you always inspire me! 🙂

    Reply to Anne
  • Jen

    You’re an ignorant piece of shit. Also, quit photoshopping your photos. We all know you’re fat.

    And while you’re at it, go back to school. Your grammar is awful.

    Reply to Jen
  • Danielle

    I’ve been reading your blog for several years now and I just wanted to say you are such a huge inspiration to me!!! I love reading your blog! I don’t get why people are being so negative, you definitely said nothing wrong. Your responses to all the haters have been so great though! Thank you for being such an amazing inspiration and for all of the great recipes, workout ideas, and more. Oh and I’ve never seen The Bachelor but my cousin went to college with and knows Ben, one of his good friends dated him. Have a great day! God bless! 🙂

    Reply to Danielle
  • Nico

    Your visit to Baltimore was nothing more than poverty tourism. There are some really pressing ethical issues with it, not least of which is the consent (or lack thereof) between you and the people you observed, particularly because you posted a picture of someone on your blog without giving them the opportunity to give you permission to do so. You denied that person their very agency as a human being.

    If you’re interested in reading more about the ethics of poverty tourism, I really encourage you to read this working law paper from Boston University: http://www.bu.edu/law/faculty/scholarship/workingpapers/documents/SelingerE-OuttersonK-WhyteK052411a.pdf

    I don’t dispute that what you saw and experienced made you grateful for the many blessings in your life. I just think it comes off as tremendously privileged the way you presented the narrative of Baltimore. I think there is a way to write about your experiences, but in a much more sensitive and ethical manner. There are a myriad of articles to which you could have linked your readers, and you could have highlighted the systemic issues faced by some Baltimore residents. It doesn’t have to be a footnote in a very long post about your trip out of the Carolinas – it could stand as its own piece of work. I also think that your readers would be more receptive to such an approach, because it would show that you have an understanding of the issue beyond what personally scares you. Please, don’t misinterpret me – I don’t doubt that you learned a lot on your ride along. You just didn’t present that to your readers at all, nor did you really try to educate your readers on what’s going on in Baltimore outside of your individual ride-along.

    I am going to include a few links for you or whomever is reading the comments, because I think this is an issue that deserves education, reflection, and discussion.

    This link looks at the inequality in Baltimore compared with other U.S. cities (note: about average): http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/the-avenue/posts/2015/05/11-poverty-inequality-baltimore-berube-mcdearman

    This piece from the Atlantic has an interesting take on the riots from last spring:
    http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/04/nonviolence-as-compliance/391640/

    There are real concerns about how the media portrayed the riots versus how they’re portraying the antics of the Bundy family in the PNW: http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/blog/bal-edwards-claims-media-bias-in-oregon-standoff-vs-riots-20160104-story.html

    Finally, if you read no other articles in my list (and you really should read the link about poverty tourism), please read this NY Times op-ed. It is a tremendous piece that specifically addresses why Baltimore has so many issues, despite having income inequality that’s in line with the national average. The author also links to some very interesting reading, providing more reading if anyone is so inclined. http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/10/opinion/sunday/how-racism-doomed-baltimore.html?_r=0

    I don’t believe in disagreeing with someone without providing at least some evidence to back it up. I really do hope you will read my comment and consider the points I’ve brought up, even if you retain the opinion you had before.

    If anyone made it this far, thanks for reading.

    Reply to Nico
    • T

      I couldn’t have said it better. Thanks for the links, Nico!

      Reply to T
    • Sara

      Amazing resources, Particularly liked the Op-Ed. Thanks a lot for educating me!

      Reply to Sara
    • Callyy

      Thanks for sharing these articles! Ta-Nahisi Coates is amazing and I’m glad that some of us here actually care about social injustice!

      Reply to Callyy
  • Pauli

    Tara, the reason so many people are upset about your Baltimore comments is because of your choice of words. While no one is negating your emotional state (terrifying) during your ride along, they don’t appreciate their hometown being called “scary and sad” when it’s mentioned for the first time in your public blog. There’s good and bad to every city. I’m sure Charlotte has some unpleasant parts to it too. You have lived in cities that are considered “scarier” before (Chicago and Detroit) and not once did we hear about the massive shootings, drug use or robberies that go on there. I would know as I’ve lived in Chicago my whole life and have had my fair share of unpleasant experiences. There’s so much more than what meets the eye and while I respect the cop and what he sees on the daily basis, remember he’s only around for the bad.

    It’s upsetting to hear that your view on people’s life choices is so black and white when you don’t know their whole story and jumping to conclusions about their lifestyles. It’s easy to look at just the bad and not the good. Shit the media does it ever day creating this fear epidemic throughout our country! And while you say you are sympathetic of their situations you are also judging them like so other. Just because someone has followed one bad path in their life doesn’t mean they should forever be cast off as this “bad” person. This could easily be said about you with your former eating disorder as you were essentially killing yourself. But you came back and people respect that. Gain some insight into who these people are and what their stories are (from all perspectives) before you formulate opinions. Don’t be so holy and above it all. I’m sure you’ve done things illegally in your lifetime (underage drinking for one thing) or know people who’ve done drugs. This world is full of gray.

    And as a last note. Ending your rebuttles with “have a good day, God bless” is extremely patronizing. Drop the sass and people will have MUCH more respect for you.

    Reply to Pauli
    • Karrie

      THIS!!! This is everything you should take away from your ignorant post. Why don’t you just accept that you wrote a shitty thing and took a crappy picture of someone? This “business” that you run by writing a blog gets less professional daily with your little temper tantrums.

      Reply to Karrie
      • Taralynn McNitt

        There was nothing ignorant about my post and I’m sorry you took it that way. I will not apologize for my personal opinion. If you do not agree, you can easily exit from my blog or agree to disagree. I don’t think anything I wrote can be considered a “temper tantrum.” I’m also sorry if you took it that way.

        Reply to Taralynn McNitt
        • Michelle

          Tara, it’s ok to listen to other people and learn from them and maybe even consider new aspects to your opinion. That’s not apologizing for your opinion, that is learning and growing. You don’t have to stick 100% to everything you say/think/write to have personal integrity. It’s ok to defend yourself, but not once in your comments do you say “You make good points, maybe I should rethink the way I look at such and such.” Or “Thank you for your comment, I wasn’t trying to be hurtful to anyone from Baltimore, but perhaps my point didn’t come across”. And adding “Have a great day. God Bless” to some of your responses is passive aggressive and rude, whether you want to admit it or not. You know it is.

          To me, when I hear someone complain about people being to sensitive or getting offended to easily or being too politically correct, i think maybe that person just doesn’t want to admit they might be acting/speaking like, frankly, an asshole.

          Reply to Michelle
    • Amy

      I totally agree with this comment. I have never left a comment on any of your blogs but I felt compelled to do so on this one. I have admired you as an entrepreneur and fellow Christian and I have followed your blog for a long time. I can respect that this is your PERSONAL blog and that you should be able to state whatever your opinions are freely. This being said I should also be able to voice my extreme disappointment in your comments and viewpoint. It is unfair for you to say that an individuals circumstance should have no bearing on where they end up in life. It is so easy to sit and say that if you were in their shoes you would never go down their path but the fact is, you will never be in their shoes and you will never know what they have gone through that has lead them to where they are. Every city has a “scary” part of it and I honestly have no problem with you expressing that you were terrified. My problem if your attitude towards the individuals who live there.
      1 Peter 3:8 Finally, all of you should be of one mind. Sympathize with each other. Love each other as brothers and sisters. Be tenderhearted, and keep a humble attitude.
      Many readers have told you in various ways to “check your privilege” and I couldn’t agree more. Reflect on the ways your socioeconomic status has given you an ADVANTAGE in the world- whether you asked for it or not- while their socioeconomic status has given them a DISADVANTAGE- whether they asked for it or not. This is not an insult by any means. All I am asking is that you be compassionate towards the particular struggle that they’ve had, and to acknowledge that their struggle has been different from yours. I’m not saying you’ve never struggled, your life has not been easy either but it is important to acknowledge that there are struggles that you will never have to encounter in your life and that you shouldn’t judge those walking that journey.

      Reply to Amy
      • Erin

        I 100% agree with this comment. I love reading her blogs, but we have to keep in mind she is young and doesn’t understand many things yet. That will happen with maturity and more life experiences.

        Reply to Erin
      • Taralynn McNitt

        I believe your post is off base as I DO have sympathy for poeple but I will never say that doing drugs is okay because of the situation you were raised. Also, please read all comments before posting because I have already addressed this issue and have openly said I have sympathy.

        Reply to Taralynn McNitt
        • T

          Hi Taralynn–

          It doesn’t end at sympathy. I am troubled that you think it ends there, or that one could be freed from this label of being racist or ignorant, just by recognizing that systemic injustices exist. The effects of pervasive racism in our country can’t really be addressed by providing rec centers, in my opinion. The prerequisite to meaningful change is to find spaces of personal growth first. I would check out Tim Wise and his words on “White Denial.” I watched his TED talk and it really got me thinking and the ways I’ve been unknowingly racist. I should also add that I’m not White–I’m Chinese– but that I come from a privileged background. In the TED talk, Wise unpacks White privilege (which I could still relate to) too. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9AMY2Bvxuxc. This really is a valuable listen for all. I hope you spend some time thinking about this.

          Coming from a place of love and concern,
          T

          Reply to T
        • Pauli

          While I’d love a response to my original comment above I’d like to add that I respect your opinion as it is yours but I, like many others, just have a hard time agreeing with it.

          I think you do have sympathy for people in more unfortunate situations than your own and I’m sure, as you’ve said in previous comments, would love to help out in some way too. Which is great! Power to you. I guess my issue isn’t even your original comment about Baltimore, but your stance on people who do drugs as it almost comes off hypocritical coming from you. Hear me out.

          You’ve gone through your fair share of hardships (bullying, eating disorders, etc) but are willing to say that your ED is not a product of the situation you were in? Had it not been for the girls who bullied you or the guy who dumped you, maybe you wouldn’t have been triggered to lose weight. You ultimately made that choice to make healthy decisions (at first) that unfortunately lead to more unhealthy decisions. Just how you used the example of the crack addict CHOOSING to do crack, you ultimately CHOSE to skip a meal or be extra conscientious of your calorie intake while lead you down that ED lifestyle. And all power to you for recovering and coming out of it stronger. Mad respect. But if more people were so black and white about your situation you wouldn’t have had any support from friends or family or your followers (who are strangers at the end of the day) bc you’d be cast off as someone who ruined their life bc of this choice. Just think about it.

          Once again, I respect your opinion but it’s unfortunately not something I can agree with. All I wish is for you is not be so stubborn and really read what some of the commenters are saying as they too mean it with their best of intentions. Remember the world is much greyer than you think.

          much love.

          Reply to Pauli
          • Taralynn McNitt

            I’m sorry, but the two situations are completely different. An eating disorder is a mental illness and can’t be compared to being a murderer, drug addict, or prostitute. Also, I don’t even know what you’re trying to get at. I’m guessing you never read my other comments. All I said what I don’t believe in making excuses for people. You’re also sitting there trying to make excuses for my eating disorder. Do more “fixing” rather than making more “excuses.”

            Reply to Taralynn McNitt
            • Carmen

              Eating Disorder is an addiction and mental illness. Probably just smart to keep poverty and stuff off your blog.

              Reply to Carmen
            • Pauli

              I’ve read all your comments before writing my own as I make sure to gather all the facts I can before formulating an opinion. I’m not excusing your eating disorder but I was trying to get you to understand how someone with one type of addiction (drugs or alcohol or whatever) can be very similar to your own personal addiction. I just wanted you to open up and see you can’t pick and choose who’s behavior is excusable and who’s isn’t. That’s all.

              Honestly trying to reason with you is exhausting as you refuse to listen to what others are saying.

              Reply to Pauli
            • Jodi

              Drug addiction and alcoholism are absolutely mental illnesses. They are listed, completed with diagnostic criteria, in the DSM. This is why people are saying that you are ignorant and uneducated: because you are, quite literally, ignorant on this subject.

              Reply to Jodi
            • Sarah

              Addiction isn’t a mental illness, but eating disorders are??? Is this a joke?

              Reply to Sarah
            • Emily

              Do you know how many people commit crimes or become drug addicts because of mental illness? Eating disorders, personality disorders, schizophrenia, addition ALL = mental illness.
              It is sad that all of these people are trying to tell you the same thing, yet we are the ones who are wrong, not you.

              Reply to Emily
  • Sasha

    Where are the full body pics? I hope your diet is still on point – I would be so sad if you are DR chubs again. Keep up the good work! Your running really seemed to be helping so I hope you can get back to that asap!

    Reply to Sasha
    • Emmie

      What a mean, unproductive set of things to say. I would love to know what you gained from saying this, because it certainly didn’t add anything to Tara’s life. Might I suggest elevating, rather than bringing people down? You’d be amazed at how much better you feel about yourself and how much better other’s feel about themselves.

      Reply to Emmie
    • Nat

      Jesus. Talk about a backhanded compliment. So sad.

      Sorry you’re dealing with this, T! This goes to show you can’t please everyone. you’ve handled this whole thing so well!! Xo

      Reply to Nat
  • Michelle

    Tara your responses are more troubling than the part of your post that people are responding to. You have readers giving you feedback and your first response is to say they are too sensitive and that you’re sorry you aren’t politically correct. Regardless of what you said, you are a very public blogger and you should be better prepared to respond to some of these thoughtful reader comments.

    Reply to Michelle
  • Anissa

    If everyone on here is so concerned with her portrayal of a city and offended by it then dont read her blog. I live in NY and although I adore my city some streets are crime ridden and full of drugs and when I myself go into those areas I lock my car doors and avoid eye contact woth people. Some citys truly are scary but the civilians who occupy it can change it aswell and they do NOT. There are bums on every corner and you wanna know something?! They had to go through numerous things in order to get that low, so there is absolutly no excuse. As she stated she was visiting her Boyfriends cousin if I recall and this was not for sight seeing. If she had the time or ability to explore the city I can almost guarantee you she would have pointed out the beautiful sights the city had to offer. Also, her tour guide was a police officer you must not understand that he deals with this on a daily basis and is used tobit so if thats what he choose to show them so be it!! But for anyone to come on her blog that she cares about and shares her journeys with and belittle her must not have a life, how about you all go and start a blog on the beautiful crimeless coty of Baltimore and then bad talk her. Gosh im so sorry you need to deal with this because clearly they are the uneducated ones supporting crime and drugs.

    Reply to Anissa
  • Shellby

    Hi Taralynn! I have been reading your blog for a couple years now and always enjoy your pictures and recipes! I went to Towson University and now live in Baltimore city so this post was one of my favorites to read 🙂

    I felt the need to comment on this post because it seems like a lot of people got their panties in a bunch over the experience you had in Baltimore. Everyone is so quick to get offended these days! I think everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but it was so rude for people to attack you on YOUR BLOG about YOUR EXPERIENCE. Its a real eye-opener to see some of those bad areas. Luckily, not all parts are like that and I look forward to reading about when you visit Baltimore this summer!!

    (PS: you should def try Sip n’ Bite when you come back up and get the crab cake benedict, I promise it never disappoints! I should mention their service is never that great, but I’ve never had a meal I didn’t like lol)

    Reply to Shellby
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Thanks so much Shellby!

      I ‘m excited to come back and try the yummy crab cakes and get the chance to experience the city. Crab cake benedict sounds fantastic!

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Sarah

    What angers me about these negative comments is that it may affect the way you post in the future.. I enjoy reading your perspective and opinions on YOUR blog. Please don’t feel the need to sensor yourself in the future. At times I’ve thought you were too sugar coated on certain things, and so listening to you as a real person and not some robotic, politically correct person behind a computer is very refreshing. Keep doing you! The majority of us appreciate it 🙂

    Reply to Sarah
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Sarah,

      I will never change the way I write my blog for anyone but myself. Thank you so much for your kind words! I may not be politically correct to someone, but that is who I am. I don’t believe in sugarcoating or apologizing for something I do not feel needs apologized for. This is America.

      xo xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Kelsey

    Uhhh did I miss something? How are people offended at your Baltimore comments. You specifically said you were in a ROUGH area. That is offensive? I cant even handle how people LOVEEEE finding things to be offended at. Get a life people. Taralynn, personally, I would not even give them the time of day by responding.

    PS. I was in Baltimore for work this past summer (you’ve probably gathered that I travel quite a bit for work) stayed at the Hampton Inn downtown and walked around the inner harbor area.. loved it super nice area. BUT my coworker (who used to live in Baltimore) brought me to some of the sketch neighborhoods and yes TERRIFYING. my uber driver and some of the customers we visited attested to that as well. and guess what, they live in Baltimore as well. So the people I offend by this, cry about it. Its true so get over it. If you came to Minneapolis and told me about the sketch areas, I would simply agree and politely tell you about the awesome places to visit instead.
    ALSO, Taralynn, when you go back, I highly suggest the crabcakes at G &M (near the airport) to. die. for!!! and you also HAVE to eat at Tio Pepe’s!!

    Reply to Kelsey
  • Emily

    White privilege. It’s a thing.

    I work with “these people” every day, and it’s clear you have no idea what you’re talking about. I’m not even going to bother going there, but I do want you to imagine what it would feel like to stumble on your picture in an article entitled “Oh my God, these disgusting people living in this disgusting part of the city they’re so scary”. Did you ask permission before posting photos? Shame on you.

    Reply to Emily
    • Jessica

      Hey there! I’m not from Baltimore, but I am from Houston’s 5th ward, and I imagine it’s pretty similar. As I was reading comments on Taralynn’s blog, I couldn’t help but feel that most commenters are middle class white people themselves, who have no clue what it’s like to actually grow up here. Let me put it out there: it’s SCARY. Just like Taralynn said. That’s not having white privelage, that’s being realistic. And while I agree that “you can’t be what you can’t see,” and that the majority of people who grow up in the ghetto around crime and drug use will repeat the cycle, I’m going to say that that explains an issue, not excuses it. I am responsible for my own life. Most of my family and friends are still in the 5th ward. I sympathize with them and wish them well, but at the end of the day it’s their responsibility to take charge of their lives and become better. I myself worked hard to move out of the ghetto, because like Taralynn said, it’s SCARY there. Maybe you all are the ones that need the reality check.

      Reply to Jessica
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Who are you quoting there? Did you even read my post? Interesting how you grabbed that out of my text

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Tara

    LOL – All of the negative comments are hilarious! Everyone knows that there are areas in cities with lots of crime. And yes, ride a longs are a real thing. I have done several with cop friends in the past! I’m sure it was a humbling experience, and I’m glad you wrote about it! It sounds like some people are just looking for something negative! I loved your post, and it makes me want to travel east to see all of these areas, Baltimore included! (But especially DC!) Don’t listen to all these haters – they don’t know what their talking about. Keep doing you – there are a lot of us that love reading what you write!

    xoxo

    Reply to Tara
    • Taralynn McNitt

      lol thank you so much Tara!!

      I always appreciate and love seeing your comments. You definitely need to make it up to D.C.! We will be touring Baltimore this summer which will be fun! Hope you had an AWESOME new years!

      xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • SY

    I don’t understand why these people are so sensitive, it’s just personal feeling. Nobody has the right to blame that.

    Reply to SY
  • Abby

    Taryalynn, I have been an avid reader for years and look forward to your blog. I don’t know people are being so hard on you. I think you’re amazing! PS agree the producers made Ben choose people… I.E crazy rose on her head girl

    Reply to Abby
  • Shellie

    Hey Taralynn,
    Good job for staying calm with all those responses. I am from Baltimore myself and I also find it terrifying! I avoid the city as much as I can. I do also understand that not everyone is as lucky as I am to be able to move out of the city though. Next time you come back to Baltimore you need to go to Nacho Mamas. Their food is awesome. Hope you had a great trip.

    Reply to Shellie
  • carlee

    Why are people so damn sensitive….Geeeeeeeeze.

    Reply to carlee
  • Anonymous

    You should take some more college classes that are not about the fashion industry.

    That’s all. Have a great day

    Reply to Anonymous
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Lol You have no idea what college classes I’m taking and they definitely have nothing to do with the fashion industry. This is now just getting pretty humorous.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Anonymous

        That is, of course, assuming you haven’t dropped out already.

        Reply to Anonymous
        • Nancy

          You guys are pathetic and jealous of Taralynn

          Reply to Nancy
          • I Am Totally From the Hood Too

            Very jealous. I am from the hood and cannot afford to pay for Photoshop in order to shave 2 inches off the cellulite packed trunks that some people call thighs. Except wait. I am from the hood so I don’t have money for food and crack keeps me skinny! Especially the crack I snort right on the sidewalk!!!!!!!

            Reply to I Am Totally From the Hood Too
          • Sarah

            We are all jealous haterzzzzz.

            Reply to Sarah
      • Sara

        Maybe you should actually try to learn something about Baltimore and stick to blogging about food and exercise before trying to spread your Simply Plantation worldviews

        Reply to Sara
  • Jen H.

    Hi Taralynn!

    Sounds like you had a great trip!….I read through some of the comments above…don’t mind them. You just keep on doing what you’re doing 🙂 Your true followers will follow and support you!

    1. I did not watch the Bachelor. I stopped watching a few years ago. I hate to say it but I know it’s fake and can’t bare to waste an hour or two hours a week on that stuff!

    2. I am ready for Spring! I can’t wait to start running outside again. In Illinois it’s a frigid 20ish degrees out and I refuse to run in that kind of weather! 45 degrees and up is my perfect running weather!

    3. My 2 NYs resolutions were to make my bed everyday and floss my teeth more often! So far I’ve been doing well! Then again we are only 5 days into the new year so give it a week and check back 🙂

    God Bless 🙂

    Reply to Jen H.
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Thanks Jen!

      I started watching it a few years ago and even though a lot of it IS fake, I can’t stop…it’s so bad!

      I can’t wait to start running outside either! It’s 30 right now! blah 🙁

      Those are good resolutions and very reasonable! I just started back up on my resolution for running. I made sure it was when I got back from D.C.!

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Erin

    Hey Taralynn!
    I understand where people are coming from in a negative light. I have lived right outside of Baltimore my entire live, and my ex-boyfriend is a Baltimore City police officer… so I get it ow dangerous some parts can be. I ran the Baltimore Marathon a few years ago, and ran through “scary” parts, and ran through amazing parts (like Camden, Fells Point, and other places which readers did right about) and it was beautiful. There are many quaint neighborhoods, similar to those you wrote about in DC. I think people were offended, because your first blog (I think) blog writing about Baltimore was pretty depressing-looking. Having a cop show you around is pretty cool, because you got to see “some” real parts of Baltimore. You are also very honest on your blog, and don’t sugar-coat when it doesn’t need to be, which I admire. I am sure the next time you come to Baltimore, you will be able to see these cute neighborhoods, and all of the fabulous restaurants and nightlife in the area. Your blog is about you (titled so), and you should continue being real when you right. There are always people who will get offended, and I think you handled yourself very maturely!

    Reply to Erin
  • Lisa P.

    Hi Taralynn,

    You must come back to Baltimore to visit. There is so much more to see and explore. Despite the fact that certain areas of the city are a bit intense to most there are so many amazing areas of the city to explore and fascinating and wonderful people to meet. Fort McHenry is one of my all time faves, Federal Hill (fell down that hill when I was 7 years old, quite traumatic at the time and where I met and fell in love with my husband!), Cross Street Market, Canton, Fells Point, and of course the Inner Harbor just to name a few. You also just so happen to be in my neck of the woods. Towson is a great area, the University is just down the street and I spent countless hours strolling my kids around Towson Mall to keep them occupied when they were wee young babes. There really is lot of culture and loyalty to our city and if you come and visit on any given Friday during football season you will see most everyone decked out in the color purple for Purple Fridays, which is our way of supporting our awesome Raven’s football. Lastly, if you are going to go anywhere for crab cakes in Baltimore you need to hit Pappas Restaurant for one of the best crab cakes you will ever have. I’m glad you had a chance to visit, please come back and see us soon!

    Reply to Lisa P.
    • Emmie

      Most productive post on here!

      Reply to Emmie
    • Sea

      This is the most helpful comment I read from someone in Baltimore and is so refreshing to read. Instead of riding the troll bandwagon full of hateful commenters, you actually shone a light on some of the things your city has to offer and tried to be helpful. Thank you! I’m glad Taralynn was able to experience what she did and found it troubling enough to share how she felt instead of ignoring what she saw. She could have easily omitted that part and saved herself the barrage of holier than thou comments pouring in. Don’t hate: educate.

      Reply to Sea
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Hi Lisa!

      I plan on going to Baltimore to visit the city in the summer. I’m pretty excited to experience it. We were only there for 12 hours and wanted to see what Nick’s cousin goes through everyday. Thank you for all your suggestions and we will definitely be using them. We are also planning on going to a baseball game too! We will definitely do Pappas for crab cakes!! 🙂 thank you!

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Summer from MN!

    Tara you are awesome and I love how you share about your life so openly and honestly! Don’t let the sticklers get you down – you are great and keep doing you! Thank you for another awesome blog post.

    Reply to Summer from MN!
  • Rae

    I don’t think you should post photographs of people you don’t know. I definitely don’t think you should post a photograph of someone you don’t know on a blog underneath a comment about how “sad” and “scary” some parts of the world are. That’s honestly the least helpful and most naive thing I can think of doing. If you want to talk about injustice or poverty or what have you, fine, but don’t do it in a touristy post on a lighthearted blog and don’t post someone without their permission. Did you go up to that woman and tell her what you were going to do? Did you ask her if it was okay within the context of what you were writing? Did you tell her you were going to caption the photograph with some comment about how grateful you are about what you have?

    I used to come here for the food p0rn but I don’t think I can do that anymore. It really sucks that there are people who think it is ok to lightly mix deep, far-reaching, and pervasive societal issues in with their snaps of coffee taken while on vacay.

    Reply to Rae
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I find it very offensive that you would call that man on the stoop a women. Maybe I should have actually captioned that picture.

      Looks like you’re stretching pretty far to accuse me of something here. If you have anymore questions please refer to other comments.

      Good thing there is more food porn on the Internet.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Rae

        It’s not a stretch, and you’re coming off like a jerk.

        So, I thought it was a woman in the picture. Man, woman, doesn’t matter. If you care about other human beings, do something to help or provide a way for your readers to help. Basically you just went, “look at this scary, bad place, good thing I have money and don’t live there! Ok, bye!” It shows a true lack of understanding and genuine compassion.

        Reply to Rae
        • Samantha

          Rae please don’t judge people. Taralynn simply said she is blessed for not having to live in that situation. She wasn’t talking about the area but rather the ride along and experience with the police officer. How do you know Taralynn doesn’t show genuine compassion already? How do you know that Taralynn doesn’t work in soup kitchens or work with groups like big brother big sister? How do you know that she doesn’t show genuine compassion? Does she have to tell you what type of volunteer work she does so she can have your approval? Do you really need to know that she is truly compassionate? You are probably the same person who would criticize her and say she is doing these types of things just for show if she actually talked about it. I don’t know what Taralynn does personally but from reading her blog over the years I would bet my next paycheck she is or has been involved with organizations or outreach programs to help people.

          Reply to Samantha
          • Rae

            Samantha, I’m calling out the way she presents things on this blog and her attitude in the comments, because that’s what I can see.

            No, I wouldn’t criticize her if she did charity work. Why would I?

            And I still think she should be using a public forum (which this blog is) to promote ways to help instead of only commenting on the issues. It’s at best, a missed opportunity, at worst, callous.

            Reply to Rae
      • Emily

        I feel like the man would be more offended at you intentionally calling his home “terrifying” than being accidentally mistaken for a woman. It is obvious from your replies to comments that you have a very sheltered and privileged life. You reiterate that people in these situations should simply do better, but it’s really hard to pick yourself up by the bootstraps when you don’t even have boots. So many people are homeless or drug addicted due to MENTAL ILLNESS, not just poor life choices. Also, factor in a lack of family support/structure and society biases and judgments and it becomes nearly impossible to break the cycle. As someone who professes to follow Christianity and routinely uses “God Bless” when addressing people who call you out, you would really benefit from a dose of true life and reality. Next time, get out of the car and actually talk to these people. Learn some compassion and humility. Try to walk in their shoes and you will see how difficult it is to rise above an “unfortunate circumstance.” Many times, these people remain in their circumstances because of people like you passing unnecessary judgement and looking down on them.

        Reply to Emily
        • Linda

          Emily I am a woman from this type of neighborhood. I think I am more offended that you have the right to tell Taralynn what I would find offensive. I have my own voice. I have a suggestion for you. Read Taralynn’s post and keep your dumb judgments to yourself. Oh and kiss my black ass. I actually find it hilarious that you get mad at Taralynn for “passing judgement” (which in my humble opinion she isn’t because she is not condemning anyone) but you sit there judging her because she talks about how she was afraid in a certain section of Baltimore. You literally are ignorant and a hypocrite. I hope Taralynn found your hypocritical post as amusing as me. Emily I hope you don;t find my new nick name for you offensive. I am now referring to you as Emily a.k.a. the girl that makes smart people laugh. Why? because you are trying to act smart yourself but don’t realize you come off as a hypocrite.

          Reply to Linda
          • Emily

            “Linda” I am not only referring to Taralynn’s blog post, but also to the comments in her responses to people. It is judgmental to assume that the “crack heads dancing in the street” are there because of their poor life choices or because they don’t know right from wrong. Many people are drug addicted or homeless because of a mental illness. And as a self-professed recovered anorexic and anxiety sufferer, Taralynn should understand that mental illness is serious and detrimental. She was fortunate to be born in to a middle class, supportive family that provided her with resources and tools to overcome her struggles. Not everyone is so fortunate to have that, hence the reason many turn to drugs or end up homeless.

            Reply to Emily
      • Lis

        Yes, you really do need to caption your photos. The quite offensive Baltimore section aside, it was confusing when you were talking about the Pentagon tour and not explaining what the photos of the ‘art and memorials’ were (like the picture with what looks like rolled up newspapers in a fence?). Your readers weren’t there with you, and could not read any plaques or descriptions, so you should provide a bit more information! Also, proofreading for errors, coherency, and context is always a good idea.

        Reply to Lis
      • Rebecca

        Did you ask for permission to post the photo?

        Reply to Rebecca
  • Andrea

    I enjoyed your post, looks like you had a great trip. I hate the cold as well and am looking forward to spring. I haven’t left the house in almost 2 days because of it, the high temp yesterday was 8F not taking the wind into consideration. Unfortunately I will have to venture out tomorrow as my fridge and coffee canister are running on empty.

    Reply to Andrea
  • Susie

    Hi Tara Lynn, I really enjoy reading about your travels and the yummy food you eat. I’m glad you had a good time in Baltimore, and I hope you don’t let negative comments get to you. I’m from San Francisco, which is a gorgeous city, but definitely has bad areas. I wouldn’t take it personally or be offended if somebody said so. It’s the truth. When did America become so sensitive?

    Looking forward to the Bachelor this season. I don’t have a favorite girl yet, but should by next week!

    Reply to Susie
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I feel the same way about my hometown! Some people are just more sensitive or simply looking for a fight. Oh well! I don’t have a favorite yet either! Mine usually change by week four!

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • ellen

    so cool that you got to go to such an important and sacred place like The Arlington National Cemetery! Its so special that it is a National cemetery and honors our fallen soldiers.

    Reply to ellen
  • Alex

    Taralynn,

    Those who know you know you meant no harm 🙂 You were posting about your day and an experience you had, not on the city of Baltimore itself. I’ve been a dedicated reader for a few years now and look forward to reading your posts every day on my lunch break. Keep being the beautiful, inspirational you! Lots of love from Phoenix! Xo

    Reply to Alex
  • Heather @ Polyglot Jot

    Such great pictures! And wow that is some delicious looking food! Im not watching the bachelor but i watched the biggest loser premier last night! woo hoo! haha! I’m ready for spring i hate the cold and today’s high of the day where i live was 30 degrees with windchills in the negatives 🙁 sad face!

    Also, thicker than a harry potter book made me laugh out loud! haha!

    Reply to Heather @ Polyglot Jot
  • Abbie

    So a blurry photo of a person who is black is what you’ve got to describe how scary an hour you had? And did you think anyone actually would believe that three armed robberies, multiple drug deals and usage took place under the eye of a cop who did nothing to stop it?

    Other photos are nice, blog was a fund read, but with the way the national spotlight it turning so horrendously racist and fear obsessed I have decided that my way to combat this is to stop giving attention to those that perpetuate hate and ignorance.

    My thanks for the entertainment. I won’t be coming back.

    Reply to Abbie
    • Liz

      Well said.

      Reply to Liz
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Well I didn’t mention race a single time, the picture was of the “area” and blurred so the persons identity was kept private. You don’t have to believe what I saw yesterday, but you do need to take a ride along in an area like that with a police officer before you can say that they do nothing to combat those issues or what I said happened didn’t really happen. Also, he’s not just one cop in the entire area. There are 3800 police officers in Baltimore and there were arrest involved in those armed robberies. As far as the random drug use, the dealers give out samples to crack addicts which is such a small amount if he does arrest them, it’s not enough to lock up the dealers or the users which means no good comes out of it. What many people don’t know is that if you can get an arrest with enough drugs to hold a charge the first steps the courts try to take is to put these people in drug rehabilitation programs before jail time. If the persons breaks the program, then they will be sentenced. If they last on the program and clean up and stay out of trouble, all charges are dropped.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Anonymous

        I’ve lived in Detroit my entire life, so no need to feel compelled to compare what I’ve seen to what had to be explained to you in a ride along with your pal. So, yes, this was correct. You even bothering to mention some poverty tourism, like you took a trip to the Hood Museum, is racist, tactless and there was no need to even mention most of this. I’m sure as well that a good portion of your account was either fiction or terribly misunderstood (at best) and you certainly aren’t an expert on living in poverty or what others are forced to deal with. You’re a privileged girl who photographs your fancy coffees and can afford to look down on others while eating pizza and photoshopping yourself skinny. You came off juvenile and silly and your many attempts to talk your way out of it make you look even worse. Good thing for you many of your readers are equally as valid and clueless, so they’ll stick around.

        Reply to Anonymous
      • Sara

        Nice Google skills!

        You really should watch The Wire. You love Netflix, I’m sure you have HBO GO. It’s a really, really good quality drama, unlike The Bachelor, and maybe it will help you learn a little more about Baltimore.

        Reply to Sara
        • Jayln

          If you watch the wire for you information that explains a lot. Sara….AKA the fuck girl

          Reply to Jayln
        • Taralynn McNitt

          Not Google, but the cops were explaining to us why there were ten people walking out of a vacant row house.

          And no I don’t have HBO go or cable.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Sara

            Well, they sound like really great cops to not arrest 10 people walking out of a row house and just explain it to a tourist 🙂 You have good relatives! God bless! xoxo

            Reply to Sara
      • Jessica

        Can you please stop insinuating that you need to go on a ride along with a police officer in order to understand what goes on in these neighborhoods? Just because you only found out days ago doesn’t mean that the rest of us aren’t well aware or personally impacting by it.

        Thank You!

        Reply to Jessica
        • Taralynn McNitt

          I’m not insinuating that you have to go on a ride along. It’s directed at individual people making comments that have no real understanding of what is actually going on in those neighborhoods. I was questioning the cop as to why he wouldnt arrest someone for using drugs on the street and he explained it all. It takes more than just tv shows or the news to fully understand what is going on or how bad those neighborhoods are. It’s not directed at everyone. I understand some people don’t need to go on a ride along to be affected by that type of life.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Julia

            I’ve lived in Detroit my entire life, so no need to feel compelled to compare what I’ve seen to what had to be explained to you in a ride along with your pal. So, yes, this was correct. You even bothering to mention some poverty tourism, like you took a trip to the Hood Museum, is racist, tactless and there was no need to even mention most of this. I’m sure as well that a good portion of your account was either fiction or terribly misunderstood (at best) and you certainly aren’t an expert on living in poverty or what others are forced to deal with. You’re a privileged girl who photographs your fancy coffees and can afford to look down on others while eating pizza and photoshopping yourself skinny. You came off juvenile and silly and your many attempts to talk your way out of it make you look even worse. Good thing for you many of your readers are equally as valid and clueless, so they’ll stick around.

            Reply to Julia
            • OnePersonWhoMadeItOut

              Julia, you are an idiot. You really are. I am black and from one of these areas. I never once did crack or sold drugs even though I had multiple “gangsters” threatening to kill my mom (grew up without a dad) if I didn’t. To call Taralynn a racist for being scared in a rough neighborhood is ignorance. Let me guess Julia you are a white female and you are sitting here calling Tarlaynn ignorant. PLEASE SPARE ME. What part of Detroit? that middle class neighborhood on the outskirts of the city doesn’t count as Detroit or a rough neighborhood. Please do not try to misrepresent where you come from in order to prove a point. I am actually a person who made it out of one of these areas. I am lucky I made the right choices and didn’t succumb to the pier pressure. I went to college got my education and become book smart. But the best part is I am street smart too and I am able to see through a person like you Julia. You are some liberal who wants to sit here and call people ignorant because they said they do not make excuses for a bad behavior someone developed regardless of their life circumstances. If you read the comments it is clear Taralynn has compassion. It is not offensive for Taralynn to be afraid and express that fear. In fact I think anyone who says they are not afraid in these type of areas are truly ignorant. let me enlighten you. Gangsters carry guns because they are afraid another gangster is going to sneak up on them and kill them. Most likely over some real ignorant shit like he sold crack 1 block too far west of his neighborhood and that isn’t technically his territory so he needs to be “dealt” with.Kids are afraid living in these ghetto ass section 8 housing so they sleep in the bathtub all summer long. Why is that? because they are afraid a stray bullet form a thug gunfight might come through their window and kill them (happens all the time Julia please educate yourself). The crackhead is afraid of reality so the turn to crack as their form of escape. I see it happen all the time. The reality is they were sexually abused and it fucked them up or maybe they are a veteran with PTSD or someone with a mental illness who is afraid of the medication making them feel weird and out of touch with reality. Have you actually seen the studies? Most of the homeless crack fiends actually choose that lifestyle before they would choose sobriety. Cleaned up drug addicts (you will always be an addict once an addict) will tell you that they chose it and made their decision to stay in “the life”.

              Even though Taralynn does come from more privilege than the people she witnessed on the streets she is actually the one I respect in the situation for actually talking about what scares her on a public forum. Trust me being from one of these hoods I was afraid my whole life. People like Taralynn are actually tougher than any one of you who criticize her. None of you ever put your life under a microscope just to be criticized by some interent bully who is afraid to show their face or make the same comments to Taralynn’s face. You hide behind a monitor or keyboard. How about this you e-mail me your address, I will come pick you up and bring you to my hood. I then want you to describe my hood on this same public blog we can even do it right here in the comment section. Let’s see how people respond to you. If you say you aren’t scared I will be the first person to call you a liar. Julia please do the world a favor and stop trolling Taralynn and go do something productive with your life. Maybe that way one day when you leave this earth someone will have something good to say about you. If you want my e-mail so you can take me up on my offer please respond to this and I will give it to you.

              Reply to OnePersonWhoMadeItOut
              • jane

                Wow. Just… wow.

                Reply to jane
              • Julia

                And feel free to send me that email, dear. I’m pretty sure I know where it’s coming from.

                Reply to Julia
                • Leah

                  You go Julia! Funny how this person had some pretty Tara looking typos. For someone who “got book smart”, I would like for them to define what an “interent bully” is.

                  Count me in as someone who would like this person’s email address. I’d be happy to trade some statistics with this charming specimen of the human race who likely cannot identify what it means for an article to come from a peer-reviewed journal.

                  Reply to Leah
                  • Some other ex friend of Tara’s how’s MC doing?

                    I’m also down for your email please TL, I know you have dyslexia so things like “pier pressure” and “Tarlaynn” can be forgiven but you could at least check your grammar before posting miss “book and street smart”.

                    Reply to Some other ex friend of Tara's how's MC doing?
              • Julia

                Thanks, Nicholas.

                I didn’t say outskirts. I said Detroit. I can read and write, so I meant what I typed. I also didn’t say a damn thing about everyone doing drugs…I said that her minutes long car trip had nothing on what I’d see going to and from school/work/family.

                I also don’t need to see myself as one who made it out, because I was always fine. I lived in, then near some rough neighborhoods, but I’ve always lived in a nice place and chose to stay in my hometown.

                Thanks for the invite to your hood, but you don’t seem friendly so I don’t think I’d want to spend time with you.

                Reply to Julia
  • M. C.

    Every city has its problems, and there isn’t anything wrong with you mentioning what you experienced because that’s part of what your blog is about! I loved this post, especially your photographs! Makes me want to visit D.C. This summer 😄
    And I completely agree with you that Ben kept certain girls just because the peroducers wanted him to. There’s no way the girl with the flower on her head is normal!!

    Reply to M. C.
  • ashley

    What’s so “terrifying” about a person sitting on a stoop (I hope you asked permission before posting their photo, btw)? You need a reality check.

    Reply to ashley
    • Jamal

      Ashley you literally sound like a dumb jealous bitch with this post. Do you really think Taralynn was scared of the person sitting on the stoop or that she purposely photographed that person? I hope I did offend your dumbass. How about you stop being such a pussy. You literally read a long post about Taralynn traveling and all the great things she did, developed jealousy because you will never be as cool or as successful or be able to take the same type of pictures or develop the same type of following as her. You then looked for the one sentence in a 1500 word post to try and critique her and bring her down and started commenting. How is that for a reality check. BTW I am from a similar type of hood as the one Taralynn drove through and I really think you can use the reality check. Come stand on my corner every night and tell me you aren’t scared. You would be pimped out faster than you could blink a fucking eye.

      Reply to Jamal
      • I Am Totally From the Hood Too

        We’re supposed to believe a guy who grew up in poverty in a bad part of town, named Jamal, is a fan of Taralynn’s Whiter than White Existence, and not only reads this blog, but took time out of his busy day in order to defend her?

        LOL okay

        Reply to I Am Totally From the Hood Too
        • Emmie

          I feel like you all could be doing more valuable things with your time, rather than spamming this blog with your bullying?

          Reply to Emmie
      • Really Nice

        Hi Nick!! LOL

        Reply to Really Nice
        • Taralynn McNitt

          My boyfriend wouldn’t come to my blog spamming in the comments. If he wanted to say something, he’d do it without being anonymous or making up a fake name. I’m sure that “Jamal” isn’t someones real username, but it’s definitely not Nick.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Abbie

            Of course it isn’t, nick. It’s you…

            Reply to Abbie
            • Taralynn McNitt

              lol i don’t need to create accounts to comment. I can openly comment under my name.

              Reply to Taralynn McNitt
              • Abbie

                But you can only secretly comment and pretend to be someone else under a different name. Most of your “supporters” in this thread, Jamal, OneWhoGotOut (or whatever), etc…. All point to the same web address and have the same writing style.

                They’re all you.

                Reply to Abbie
                • Taralynn McNitt

                  They aren’t, but if you want to believe that , then great. I don’t don’t use those words or would ever call someone those names. That is not who I am.

                  Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Leah

            Did Jamal take the time to count the words in that post? Oh my what a devoted fan. *yawn*

            Reply to Leah
      • Sarah

        Lol at you expecting us to believe a guy named Jamal is a fan of your blog?? Most of the comments gushing over you are all people without a picture or blog associated. Glad you weren’t pimped out in the blink of an eye tara! Lol for days

        Reply to Sarah
      • Nice

        What a kind, gentle person you are, Jamal.

        Reply to Nice
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Lol who said he was terrifying?

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Blair Smithson

        TBH you did….right before that picture of the person in the stoop you said it was one of the most terrifying areas of DC and how scary it is! I love you and you’re blog Taralynn but I don’t think it’s very good to put pictures of strangers on your blog without their permission, especially after a paragraph describing how terrifying that area is…maybe you might want to delete the picture with a regular person in it…

        Reply to Blair Smithson
        • ashley

          Wow, “Jamal”….(suuuuure you’re Jamal and you live in the hood). You sound like a kind person. I hope Taralynn plans to stick up for me for calling me a “dumb jealous bitch…such a pussy.” Classy.

          And Tara, you posted this under the picture of the person and a much brighter picture of the city: “Even though there are some really scary parts of Baltimore, there are some really gorgeous parts too!” So, nice try. You still called a person sitting on a stoop scary.

          Reply to ashley
  • Tim

    Since when did America get so soft? This country needs viagria!

    Reply to Tim
  • Caroline

    I have never been to Baltimore but I have a friend who goes to art school there and she says there are a lot of other things to do around there besides what you listed.

    It is disappointing that you used only one part of your experience to characterize an entire city when it seems you didn’t see much.

    Also, what was the point of doing a ride along with a police officer if it was going to be in dangerous areas?

    Reply to Caroline
    • Taralynn McNitt

      This is nicks family member that he grew up with that comes from a pretty tough area and he wanted Nick and I to experience what he deals with whiles at work on an everyday basis.

      This was not a post about “things to do in Baltimore” it was about my personal experience yesterday. There were some very beautiful parts of Baltimore as I mentioned in my post. We planned a trip to go back in the summer so we can experience all of Baltimore. This was not an attack on the city, just me explaining what I did yesterday.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Caroline

        I don’t think I would qualify visiting a suburban mall as “seeing a gorgeous part of the city.” What is the point of traveling if you are not going to take the time to visit areas that make a city unique and special?

        I’m glad you got to spend some time with Nick’s family member but it really just sounds like you were seeking out some excitement by going along with this. You only talked about things you saw from your perspective, you didn’t actually talk about his perspective as a police officer- unless the whole purpose of the thing was for him to just point out bad area of crime and have a running commentary on the whole thing. If this is the case, shame on all 3 of you.

        I like your outfit posts and similar items, and think you should stick with what you’re good at.

        Reply to Caroline
        • Emmie

          Caroline, she never said once in her post that going to a mall qualified as the gorgeous parts of the city. I think you’re taking a lot of things out of context here and making them mean what you would like to. Also, this is a personal blog.

          If you only want to read about “outfit posts and similar items”, perhaps just skim for those? Trying to dictate someone else’s blog in an undercutting way seems a little rude, no?

          Reply to Emmie
  • Rachael

    Wow. It’s unfortunate how negative and rude people can be! I always love your DC posts. I haven’t been there in years and I am dying to go back! It looks beautiful everywhere and I really want to check out the food scene there. Sounds like you had a great trip! P.S. As a coffee lover and recovering addict, I’m truly jealous of how much coffee you can drink in day.

    Reply to Rachael
  • Rachael

    Wow, it’s unfortunate how many people are so negative about things! I always love your DC posts. I haven’t been there in years and I can’t wait to go back. It looks so beautiful and there seem to be so many foodie spots. I can’t wait to go back! Sounds like a fun trip!

    Reply to Rachael
  • AC

    I would suggest that people start reading information on multigenerational trauma. Addiction is a major issue and people need to realize that there are circumstances that aren’t afforded to a major portion of the population. This does not mean we should turn a blind eye but rather mind how we speak about the issue and instead of saying such general things as there are”scary/bad” parts of a city we should try and speak about the issue in a respectful way. Also it is unfortunate that people need to “gawk” at those who live a different lifestyle then they do. If you find those parts of a city to be scary then don’t visit them just to see firsthand the terrible conditions unless you are planning to do something positive about the issue like bring awareness.

    Reply to AC
  • Nikki

    “glasses thicker than a Harry Potter book” 🙂 this made me laugh out loud! Loved the the description!

    Reply to Nikki
  • Jess

    Love these recaps! You inspired me to start writing down all of my adventures because I think it’s awesome that you have these posts to look back on! I don’t follow many bloggers that aren’t food or fitness bloggers but I have been following your blog for a couple years now and I love that you care so much about your readers. Keep up the amazing work – there are always going to be haters no matter what you say 🙂

    Reply to Jess
  • Selina

    I can’t believe that people come here and attack you for things that you say. I think you handled their negative comments with grace. Kudos to you, Taralynn. I love reading your blogs and if you visited my city and said something negative about it I’d still love reading your blogs. Keep up the great work. I’ll always be a fan. 🙂

    Reply to Selina
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Thank you Selina!

      I didn’t mean anything negative or try to go out of my way to hurt someone’s feelings, but people see things the way they want to. Xoxo

      Thanks so much for being a reader! Xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Laura Beth

    My family went to DC & Baltimore on family vacation 2 summers ago! I am in love with DC and want to go back ASAP… I am from a small town in the south, so I never expected to like such a big city so much, but MAN I love it! It’s so beautiful and totally underrated in my opinion 🙂 People think it’s just a bunch of political people and boring history and stuff, but you change your mind when you see it in person.

    I had a similar experience when visiting Baltimore. Our cab driver was born and raised there so he took us on a “tour”… We saw some rough areas, but lots of beautiful parts, too. Thankfully it was nice weather, so we were able to explore a lot on foot. I really enjoyed the harbor area!

    When you return to Baltimore do 2 things:
    1) Go to an Orioles game! Even if you don’t like baseball, the environment is SO AWESOME! It’s just really fun and exciting!
    2) Go try the crab cakes at CoCo’s. Holy smokes. They are amazing!

    Xo

    Reply to Laura Beth
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Yes there is so much to do and see in D.C. and you’re so right! I thought it would be all museums and political stuff but it is so much more than that!!

      I’m excited to go back when it’s warm. I didn’t want to do much walking around in my light jacket in the 20 degree weather!

      We are definitely going to a Orioles/Yankees game in the summer!!

      We will definitely check out cocos!!

      xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Emily B

    Funny story about Baked and Wired. After you mentioning it in your blog about your trip to DC last summer, I put it on my list of places to go when my husband and I went there in August. We made our way to Georgetown one late afternoon, thinking we would have enough time before we had to be at Union Station by 7:30 for our nighttime trolley tour. We were so wrong. Definitely underestimated the walking distance from the metro to Georgetown and when we got to Baked and Wired, the line was HUGE. We didn’t want to go all that way for nothing so we waited about 20-30 minutes in line and quickly got our cupcakes and then we literally ran/speed walked all the way back to the metro. We made it to Union Station for our trolley tour with like 10 minutes to spare. We were exhausted, sweaty and looked a hot mess but DANG those cupcakes were SO worth it. I got the pistachio and my husband got the naughty unicorn one. It was a fun memory from our trip 🙂

    Reply to Emily B
  • AJ Johnson

    I think your choice of words in response to both Kerrie and Bethany were spot on. There are scary parts of every city, every town, every place in the world these days and there should be no shame in pointing it out. You weren’t by any means bashing the city or talking down about Baltimore whatsoever. I live in Minnesota. We have awful, and I mean AWFUL parts of our cities too. I’m not afraid to admit that. I’m still proud to be from here, regardless of the scary parts of it. You made perfect sense in saying that being “fortunate” has nothing to do with any of it. That was actually an incredibly ignorant statement and people need to think before jumping down someone’s throat. I don’t feel like I was raised an exceptionally “fortunate” person…but I’m not out on the streets selling drugs and killing. I got myself an education and do what I can to HELP society. Sorry, Taralynn, that you got those sorts of responses. Ignore them. Have a great day, god bless!!

    Reply to AJ Johnson
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Thank you so much for your comment and I agree with everything you said. I’m glad that you, not being from the most fortunate situation, were able to become successful and help society!

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Deanna

    Welcome to Baltimore!! I had a feeling you were at Towson mall based on your Snapchat but I wasn’t sure! I live very close to that mall. That’s so awesome that you took a trip up here. Come back soon 🙂 (Ps. Unlike everyone else reading, I am not SO easily offended. Some parts of Baltimore are scary, get over it people)

    Reply to Deanna
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Such a giant mall!!:)! That’s a nice are over there! Xoxo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Krissy

        Agreed with above poster, this is your blog, they are your opinions and thoughts. I live in Baltimore city a few miles from the harbor… There is a known crack house less than three blocks from my apartment building. Parts of the city are sad and scary. But hopefully you come back in the summer and walk around and see some of the other parts because it is a really great and harming city!

        Reply to Krissy
        • Taralynn McNitt

          Hi Krissy!

          As I said in the post “there are many gorgeous parts of Baltimore” but that was overlooked unfortunately. I’m so excited to visit the city in the summer! We have so much planned.

          xo

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
        • Krissy

          Charming**

          Reply to Krissy
  • Mel

    I love this post! I’m getting married in the summer and my fiancé and I are hoping to do New York with a few days in DC for our honeymoon (we’re from England so it’s a pretty big deal for us). I’ve got to say that it’s your recent posts about DC that have made me want to go! So excited!

    Reply to Mel
  • Rachel

    People are so silly sometimes. This is your blog and you write about your personal experiences. Nuff said. Every city has their good and bad, but you can’t write about all the history and landmarks and everything Baltimore is known for since you obviously didn’t experience them, as you said, and was only there for one day visiting a friend.

    I love your posts and have been reading them for years. Don’t change for nobody! Thanks for sharing your experiences.

    Reply to Rachel
    • Chris

      I agree. It was a tiny comment, not a post about Baltimore through and through. Tara also mentioned that she wanted to visit again when it gets warmer and learn more about the city!

      Reply to Chris
    • Taralynn McNitt

      Thanks so much girl!!! Xoxo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Melissa

    1. I have never been able to get in-to the bachelor series :s lol but I know so many people that love it, and its been going on forever!
    2. I get very jealous when I see your posts back in Charlotte and it still looks so beautiful this time of year. Im from Southern Ontario in Canada and its freeezing and snowy haha. Im sure you can relate from when you lived in Michigan. So YES I am ready for Spring… and Summer! 🙂
    3. I’ve actually never been one to make ‘new years resolutions’. Not officially anyway. But I have though to myself that this year I am going to focus on doing things I enjoy and visiting new places.

    Im disappointed but not surprised by all of the negative comments to one little portion of this post… Im sure you have heard it all by now, but Im sure it never gets any easier. As someone who has never been to Baltimore, I can definitely say you didnt paint it as a scary horrible place. I think it would be really interesting to get a tour from that perspective in any city.

    Take care and Happy New Year!

    Reply to Melissa
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I just got into the seasons like two years ago. I never used to like it, but that changed!

      YIKES! I always say “if it’s going to be cold, there better be snow!” but that is not the case here lol Hope you stay warm!

      Thanks so much for your kind words too! I think people get bored and like to argue. I really don’t feel as if they’re that offended. I also think it’s kind of humorous that people analyze everything I say hoping they can use it as bait for an attack. It truly doesn’t bother me, nor keep me up at night. I know what I mean and what I stand for. In the end, that is all that matters.

      xo xo

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Karlye

    I love love love Ben as the new bachelor! Spring is my favorite, I’m so ready!! and by the way, I’m so glad you write your blog the way you want to (it’s your blog!!!) lol.

    Reply to Karlye
  • Victoria

    You take such great pictures. I definitely need to learn from you. Every time we travel I am always on the go looking at everything I forget to stop and capture it with my camera!! Some of these comments make me laugh. I look forward to your post. Can’t wait to hear why the trip was one you will never forget.

    Reply to Victoria
  • VioletaG

    I loved your post, makes me wanting to go to D.C. too in the summer. xoxo

    Reply to VioletaG
  • Amanda @ Positively Amanda

    Looks like a fun trip! Also, extra loving the photography lately, some really great pictures!

    Reply to Amanda @ Positively Amanda
  • Emily

    Sounds like you had an awesome trip! I live about 20 minutes away from D.C and never really take the time to stop and appreciate all of these places. You have inspired me to do so 🙂 I hope you have a safe trip home!

    Reply to Emily
  • Morgan

    Wouldn’t be a Monday without the bachelor! So happy it’s back on! I love Ben as the bachelor. He is so sweet and genuine (at least the way they make him out to be). My favorites so far are Lauren B, Jojo, and Caila. Lace is crazy and drama filled and definitely was kept on for drama. Mandy was also nutso so I’m sure the producers made Ben keep her on for some good TV.

    Reply to Morgan
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I agree! Ben is the best bachelor! Lace is crazzzzy but they make those girls so drunk!

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Morgan

        So true! The first rose ceremony goes on all night long and they just keep feeding them drinks for good TV! Have you watched “unreal” it’s on lifetime and it was made by an ex bachelor producer. It shows all the behind the scenes and all the craziness that goes into making the show and manipulating the contestants into doing what they want them to do for tv! Not sure how accurate it is, but so interesting!! Your traveling sounds amazing, can’t wait to get back to DC! Come visit Cleveland next 🙂

        Reply to Morgan
  • Jen

    While Baltimore does have issues, I’m slightly annoyed that the only thing positive you can point out is that it’s the home of Under Armor. Also happens to be where the National Anthem was written. Or Baltimore is home to the first cathedral in the United States. Or Babe Ruth’s home. Among numerous other historical and cultural landmarks. Baltimore is a GREAT city. And crab cakes at a chain steakhouse does not count as a crab cake from Baltimore. We take pride in our crab cakes, and there’s about a 1,000 restaurants that sever better crab cakes.

    Reply to Jen
    • Taralynn McNitt

      You forgot to mention Carmelo Anthony is from there too.

      Have a great day.
      God bless.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • X

        Responding with “Have a great day. God bless.” specifically to commenters who disagree with you, and not to other commenters, comes off as super snotty and bitchy (but I’m sure you already knew that).

        Reply to X
        • SB

          Seriously? This person who originally commented is getting upset because she didn’t state the 102 facts found on Wikipedia about her hometown… on SOMEONE ELSE’S personal blog. Last time I checked this wasn’t the city of Baltimore’s website, at least I didn’t think it was anyways?
          It’s laughable, to say the least.
          Taralynn, make sure you read the encyclopedia first before posting about any other towns you visit….. 😉

          Reply to SB
        • Taralynn McNitt

          I actually hope they do have a great day and I’m saying it because I truly mean it. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion and I respect that.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Lindsay @ A Runnaroundd Life

    Love these recaps—your photos are just so beautiful! I’ve wanted to visit DC for years, so I’m hoping to make it there this year. Definitely going to reference your posts so I know where to go 🙂

    Reply to Lindsay @ A Runnaroundd Life
  • Karrie

    “Scary parts”? People live this way because they arent as fortunate or haven’t been raised in the way the more fortunate have. You need to start choosing your words better. You sound like an idiot.

    Reply to Karrie
    • SKW

      I find trolls like you disappointing and tiresome. So miserable with your own existence that you get satisfaction in trying to make yourself superior by putting someone else down. Oldest trick in the book. Pathetic at best Please take look in the mirror and repeat the ugliness you spew. I would feel sorry for you but it would waste too much of my life energy.

      Reply to SKW
    • Jess

      I don’t think she meant anything by the comment. Saying she sounds like an “idiot” also indicates that you should start choosing your words better.

      Reply to Jess
      • Chris

        I second Jess. Without going into the debate, calling Tara names in return puts your own self in a bad light.

        Reply to Chris
    • Taralynn McNitt

      While driving down some pretty scary parts of Baltimore (yes scary) with a cop was an eye opener. He pointed out some pretty messed up things that have been going on in the area DAILY. Crack addicts were dancing in the streets, people were snorting cocaine on the side walks, and people were openly selling drugs on every corner and there were three armed robberies in the one hour we were down there.

      I don’t think being “fortunate” makes us know what’s right from wrong. If they didn’t know what was right and wrong, why would they run from a cop? To use the “unfortunate” circumstance as an excuse to become a crackhead, a drug dealer, or rob a corner store or even to be the local gangster that kills a local innocent dad in front of his own children because he didn’t want to let him sell drugs on his stoop is pathetic and the reason that major cities have these reoccurring problems. Making excuses for them won’t solve the problem, so instead of attacking my little comment on my personal blog, why don’t you walk down one of those neighborhoods and solve the issue yourself.

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • heather

        If it’s such a bad part of Baltimore, they weren’t snorting coke. That’s expensive stuff. #ComeOnNow

        Reply to heather
      • Annie

        Taralynn-

        I understand what you are saying: an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind. I agree.
        However…
        Crime in Baltimore’s (and other like cities’) unsafe neighborhoods cannot REALLY, or at MINIMUM, usually be blamed on its residents (I know you didn’t quite say that). What is causing crime, food deserts, under-education, poverty and a general lack of safety is a tremendously bigger issue than each individual crime. Baltimore and the States in general are plagued with systemic racism and systemic poverty, just to name a couple of these big issues.

        I see that your post wasn’t about Baltimore as a city, but your individual car-ride. However, I take issue with your use of the word “terrifying”…I agree that I do not want to hang out on those street corners that I’m sure you passed. But these “terrifying” streets are also where a lot of families call home. This is where people have to live.

        I hope you look into your word choice a little more and maybe understand where people are coming from getting offended.

        Reply to Annie
        • Taralynn McNitt

          I agree with most of what you said, but telling me not to use the word terrifying when something is actually terrifying (as you said yourself) is ridiculous. Being terrified is an individual emotion and what might night terrify you may terrify me and I’m going to call it as I feel it. The problem with my post is way too many people got sensitive because I wasn’t politically correct in THEIR opinion so then they take my post and twist it to try to make it something it isn’t and then try to attack me.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
      • Lauren

        Taralynn, I love you and have followed you for years, but I’m sorry this response upsets me. I have no issue mentioning that a city has scary parts, as all do (I would never walk downtown at night in my hometown!), but your justification of why people end up there is upsetting. I don’t think it’s making excuses to say that children growing up in poverty and around addiction are more likely to follow in their parents footsteps. They obviously know on some level it is wrong, but when that lifestyle is their “normal”, they have ways of justifying such behaviour (i.e. their family is suffering and they need to provide for them by finding a job where they can make some fast cash, or living in a life where they may have severe trauma from neglect or abuse has led to them abusing drugs). Addiction is an illness just as the eating disorder I went through was – I knew this was wrong when I was going through it as well. It deserves compassion. I can’t justify the murder of an innocent person obviously, but I don’t think the makeup of such a neighbourhood is as black and white as people knowing right from wrong. I deliver meals to people on the streets often, and the stories of things some of these people have lived through are heartbreaking. They do what they can to live day to day (which is why they run from cops). There needs to be a change, but this needs to be done through more support for them. Not by locking someone up then letting them back out with the same skills and into the same environment. I apologize as this isn’t meant as an attack on your opinion, I just have the hope that more can be done to help these people in the future, and this starts with people being more understanding. XO

        Reply to Lauren
        • Taralynn McNitt

          I am very understanding and compassionate about people growing up in that lifestyle and you and I have very similar beliefs, but I do believe you can be compassionate for a person and still let them know what they are doing is wrong at the same time. I agree that kids growing up in those environments and victims of abuse are more likely to fall into harmful behaviors and we need to start helping these young kids in these situations by giving them positive reinforcement such as Carmelo’s rec center that he built for kids in poverty. By helping the younger generation in these environments, it’ll have a positive impact and hopefully give them outlets to turn to instead of drugs and crime.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Rachel

            My husband worked at a place like this, trying to keep young kids away from gangs and drug crime, but sadly it usually didn’t help. At around 10 gang members would approach kids to sell drugs for them and threaten “if you don’t do it I will kill your parents”. So they of course do it, and then they threaten “if you don’t do it again I will tell your parents what you did.” It is a big circle and all the sudden they are stuck in a gang when they aren’t even an adult yet, and they have no education, and see no way out. So then they end being the ones threatening children.

            Reply to Rachel
          • Angie

            This. This is why you’re an idiot. Yay rec centers!!

            I mean, when you are a minority who lives in poverty, have no access to good education (which means you have little, if any, chance for college), housing and food insecurity, are surrounded by addicts and have half of the men in your community in prison on bullshit “war on drug” charges, those Rec centers are really going to be the great white savior.

            Reply to Angie
      • Karrie

        lol i forgot how amazing you are!!! Maybe instead of thinking I’m “attacking” you on your blog, you actually admit to how terrible you can word things at times. As I had said. Oh, and no need to say “God Bless” to me 🙂 Its the southern equivalent of “bless your heart.”

        Reply to Karrie
        • Karrie

          Oh one more thing!! Maybe they don’t want to be photographed 🙂

          Reply to Karrie
      • Meghan

        I’m sorry, but your response is so ignorant.

        Reply to Meghan
        • Taralynn McNitt

          If I’m so ignorant, please educate me on how so.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Meghan

            In reply to you, your response was ignorant because you clearly have no idea what these people go through on a daily basis or in their lifetime. It’s great that you’ve been fortunate enough to have a nice life, to eat at nice restaurants almost daily, to afford $5 lattes, to shop at whole foods, etc. but you cannot be blind to that fact that not everyone has these luxuries. If you were born into a poverty stricken family on the south side of Chicago do you think you would still have all of the luxuries that you have today? Maybe. It’s possible. It has happened. But chances are, probably not. The point is that most of these people come from NOTHING. All they’ve ever known is drugs, crime and living on the streets. Right from wrong isn’t something that is naturally instilled in us, it’s taught.

            Reply to Meghan
          • Chelle

            Well for starters, do you really think people were doing drugs and your cop friend did nothing to stop them?

            Reply to Chelle
            • amy

              actually, if people are doing drugs in the streets, cops often dont stop them. have you been to san francisco? there are literally crack heads all over, shooting up and smoking CRACK (not weed) in the streets. cops dont stop them because then they will go to jail, and believe it or not, jail is a much more pleasant than the streets. jail also robs taxpayers of millions of dollars every year.

              Reply to amy
              • Chelle

                ….you seem to know very little about America’s drug war.

                Reply to Chelle
            • Taralynn McNitt

              I think you would actually need to go on a ride along in a neighborhood like this to understand what I was talking about. It’s very eye opening and has me searching for a way to try and help kids and youth in these types of areas.

              Reply to Taralynn McNitt
              • ellen

                Wait. Are “ride alongs” a real thing? I thought they just happened on Friends and in that Ice Cube movie. Surely a police officer wouldn’t willingly bring a civilian just to watch crimes being committed…I hope you protected your sandwich, Joey.

                Reply to ellen
              • Karrie

                Will searching for a way to help kids take less time or more time than your other abandoned projects? please respond.

                Reply to Karrie
          • Jen

            For one, your personal blog is a very public forum.

            Reply to Jen
      • Carmen

        As a former AmeriCorps member who has worked one-on-one with people in poverty-stricken regions, this comment made me laugh. It’s obvious that you’re so sheltered that you don’t understand how poverty works. There are reasons why some humans fall into drug addiction and other self-destructing behaviors. You’re obviously too wrapped up in your perfect, little, middle-class world to understand or even care.

        God bless.

        Reply to Carmen
        • Taralynn McNitt

          No I actually do care and that’s why I brought the issue up, but by sitting here and making excuses up for why people do certain things will not fix the problem. I respect that you have sat and worked with them one on one and I’m sure you’ve helped tons of people, but no matter what your circumstance is I will never say “oh it’s ok to be a crack addict, it’s ok to murder people and rob people” but it doesn’t mean I don’t have sympathy for these people. I agree they need help and there needs to be solutions, but by sittig and condoning a certain behavior and saying “oh it’s ok you’ve done this because of where you came from” will not fix the problem.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
          • Molly

            I disagree. I don’t think you are empathetic at all.

            No one is ‘excusing’ these unfortunate people from the crimes they have committed – we are merely providing you with a reason why they may have done so. This is an important distinction, because it allows us to condemn the actions but remain empathetic to the HUMAN BEING behind the behaviour. Your use of language demonstrates a complete lack of empathy, or you wouldn’t resort to reducing someone to their addiction by using pejorative terms like ‘crackhead’. That ‘crackhead’ is a person, just like you. They suffer from a mental illness, just as you have. This is often compounded with homelessness, trauma and poverty, things that are completely out of their control due to systemic issues (racism, lack of decent education and housing, etc). This makes breaking the cycle of illness almost impossible feat.

            And actually mate, ‘sitting here and making excuses for why people do certain things’ WILL help solve the problem – understanding the underlying cause for behaviour is the NUMBER ONE KEY DRIVER in effecting change. It is what we can base strong, sustainable policy and legislation from. It is how we can ensure we are retaining our humanity while cleaning up our streets. It is how we can remain empathetic to those less fortunate than us, those born into a world that is unkind and places the blame solely on the individual for what is truly a social problem (or it wouldn’t be occurring on such a huge scale!)

            No one chooses to be poor, or chooses to have an addiction. Please, please educate yourself and try not to be defensive. You have so much power that could be used to really make a difference, Tara, but you will continue to have a negative impact if you do not educate yourself and do not acknowledge your own privilege and sheltered world views.

            Reply to Molly
          • ellen

            I do agree that you are empathetic. I do think you care about the issue and wished to voice your opinion. Unfortunately you are also uneducated and you don’t understand how your words are misplaced and your actions are offensive. I don’t think anyone doubts your sincerity; it was just so poorly expressed in so many ways.

            Reply to ellen
            • Taralynn McNitt

              Just because I don’t agree with your thoughts does not make me uneducated. I’d really appreciate it if you did not come to my blog and insult me. If you want to have a reasonably discussion without attacking my education level, I’d love to! If you’d like to debate or back up your opinions with facts showing that you are 100% right, that is fine. I know some people agree with you and I know some people agree with me but just because we don’t have to same opinions doesn’t mean you should personally attack someone.

              Reply to Taralynn McNitt
              • Emily

                “I’d really appreciate it if you did not come to my blog and insult me.”

                Well I would really appreciate it if you did not come to my city and insult it. Can you see the hypocrisy in your attitude yet?

                Reply to Emily
              • ellen

                struck a nerve, huh?

                Being educated about Baltimore, or race relations, or the demographics of a city have nothing to do with your degree, Taralynn. You made a sweeping generalization about an entire city, based on a few minutes in a locked car. There is so much more to Baltimore, and based on your experience, you just aren’t qualified to represent it. You presented an inaccurate picture of a city that people love and protect, and that’s why they’re so “sensitive.” Because a picture of a black man juxtaposed with an explanation that people were “smoking crack on the sidewalk” paints an unfair picture of a city, that (by your own admission) you didn’t even bother to get out of the car for.

                I didn’t come to your blog and insult you; only to point out that while your heart was in the right place, your words didn’t come across as empathetic.

                Let me put it back on you. If Baltimore is such a terrible, unsafe, dangerous place, with people doing drugs on the streets, then let me see the “facts” showing that you are 100% right, as you have asked me to.
                I don’t have to defend my position on Baltimore; I didn’t post a public blog post declaring it dangerous and scary. You did that.

                Reply to ellen
              • Angie

                You’re completely uneducated on poverty, crime, violence and addiction and their overall effects on communities. It has nothing to do with agreeing or disagreeing with opinions, it has everything to do with facts. Generations of people have been held hostage by epidemic levels of poverty, lack of quality education & housing, low job opportunities and disproportionate levels of incarceration in their communities.

                Thinking that people simply “make excuses” completely proves the point that you are oblivious to the systemic issues in high-crime, low-income neighborhoods. There is so much information available for you to better educate yourself that it is just laughable that you’re so narrow-minded and shallow but carry on with your idiotic and defensive comments. Cheers!

                Reply to Angie
      • Kara

        These people grow up in poverty and crime has been going on in those areas for years. So yes, it is unfortunate. It’s unfortunate that they were never provided with safe homes or an education. It’s unfortunate that they will commit these crimes for money. They know right and wrong as far as law is concerned but may not understand right and wrong morally. There’s a difference.

        I’m not from Baltimore, but from a city with a high crime rate. I can understand why some of your readers are offended. We are very protective of our hometowns! You have so many people reading your blog and they do not want that (misplaced) negativity on their city. Tara, I love you, I do- but please consider how your comments may have been offensive and apologize to those you may have upset. It says more about a blogger who can admit their wrongdoing than one who gets defensive.

        Reply to Kara
        • Taralynn McNitt

          I didn’t say anything offensive about Baltimore and I simply pointed out my experience the good and the bad.

          If you want to look at Baltimore from a national perspective, you’ll actually get a negative image of the city. This was not a touristy post about Baltimore like my D.C. ones and I do not feel my statement was incorrect or off point. I mean if you look at the crime rate compared to other cities it’s one of the highest per capita in the entire country. Not to mention it had the second most shootings this past year behind Chicago and it was very close considering Chicago has millions more people than Baltimore.

          Reply to Taralynn McNitt
  • Bethany

    I live in Baltimore and find it unfortunate that you chose to first mention how terrifying our city is. All cities have areas that are not safe. There are so many amazing things to see in Baltimore and its lame that you chose to talk first and foremost about the bad parts of town instead of talking up the aquarium, ft mchenry, Canton, Hampden, Federal Hill, or any of the other awesome places to visit. You say you walked all over the city but you don’t even describe any of it. I used to like to read this blog but I’m seriously disappointed in your portrayal of an awesome city full of great people.

    Reply to Bethany
    • Chelsea

      These comments are crazy. Living in Cleveland, I would never freak out on someone for calling it scary or less than ideal, or anything for that matter. People are entitled to their opinions of things they have seen or places they have been. If it really bothers you that much, choose not to read this blog, but stop the harassing someone for posting their thoughts on their own blog.

      Reply to Chelsea
    • Taralynn McNitt

      I was in Baltimore to visit a friend, not the city. I’m sure the city is great…as I mentioned. We drove around with our cop friend to see what he goes through everyday and it happens to be in a very bad part of Baltimore. I’ll do more touristy stuff next year. I never said I walked over the city as it was too cold and that’s why I mentioned next summer.

      Have a great day
      God bless

      Reply to Taralynn McNitt

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